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Customer Review

47 of 50 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The cat's whiskers, 14 Oct. 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Minstrel in the Gallery (Audio CD)
Have to admit, this was never one of my favourite Tull albums, and, never having upgraded to a CD version, this remaster was the first time I'd heard it in its entirety for almost 15 years.
And what a great album it is! Never mind the codpiece, here's the dog's bollocks: the interplay of acoustic guitar, flute and string quartet is delicate and dramatic by turns, melodies twist and turn and return in the most alluring fashion, and Ian Anderson never wrote a better set of love-twisted, postmodern, inventively fractured lyrics. Perhaps only when they 'rock out' do the band sound slightly rigid, with Martin Barre still in his 70s-style guitar mode of triplets-a-go-go topped with a grimacing squeal on the high fret. But when 'Summerday Sands' swings in after the original album's 'end', you know why this was such a unique band, and why, in the spectrum of what passes for 'rock' music, this is an astoundingly brave record for its time. Anderson has said it sounds like 'Roy Harper in love.' What more could you want?!
Grumbles: the two final 'live' tracks are the pointlessly edited versions which appeared on the 20 Years box set, and not the full versions. What a wasted opportunity. And whoever put the lyric booklet together (strangely) never bothered to proof-read the results: they're sourced from a Word document which doesn't recognize the apostrophe! i.e. "the old men[]s cackle" . . .
"there[]s nobody left for tennis" . . . Shoddy work.
Buy it for the sounds.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 20 May 2015 03:30:47 BDT
AMP59 says:
I sort of agree with your comment on "brave record", but I'd have to put Roy Harper's beautiful "HQ" ahead of it, Pink Floyd's "Wish You Were Here" around the same level & Led Zeppelin's "Physical Graffiti" as the bravest of the lot, where not a single note throughout ever gets repeated & where every track is entirely different from the last & the next. I'll never understand these idiot critics who said (& in some cases have never stopped saying) that the mid-70's were self indulgent & boring.
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