Customer Review

20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A MUST Read for Every OO Developer !!! (but the book is now a bit dated... see my comment to this review), 21 Dec. 2000
This review is from: Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code (Object Technology Series) (Hardcover)
This book is simply great !! It's definately the most useful book I've read since "Design Patterns".

It has an easily read and also sometimes quite amusing text, UML diagrams when necessary, and of course, VERY GOOD CONTENT !!! In short Refactoring is about turning badly designed and written code into well designed and written code, without breaking the program. If you liked read "Design Patterns" (Gamma et al.) you love this one as well. It's structured in much the same way.

The content covers

* WHY + WHEN to refactor
* HOW + WHAT to refactor
* A very good chapter on unit testing with JUnit (Open Source, by Eric Gamma (Design Patterns) and Kent Beck (Extreme Programming) )
* A thorough catalogue of different refactorings you can do to improve the design and readability of your code.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 19 Jul 2009 11:00:10 BDT
Last edited by the author on 19 Jul 2009 11:04:40 BDT
Jakob Jenkov says:
It is now 9 years since I wrote this review. In retrospective, the most important
thing I got from this book was the message:

"Don't ask your manager if it is okay to refactor. You are hired as a professional
to do the job the way you judge is best". I've since then upped myself and gotten
the courage to just change what I've found to be inappropriate design. Of course,
always consulting the rest of the team first (unless very small refactorings, local
to "my own" code).

I guess today (in 2009) you can find much better books on unit testing, and perhaps
also on refactoring. The catalogue of refactorings may seem a bit unnecessary and
no-brainer-ish, to an experienced developer.

When I wrote this review originally, I had
2 years of experience. Now I have about 10. I look at books with different eyes now.
Refactoring as a concept is definately important, but I am not sure anymore that this
book is the best option you have to learn this.

Anyways, this book started a trend. This trend has resulted in much more litterature and
experience in the subject. Some of this later litterature may of course out-shine the earlier
litterature, like this one. We, as individuals, as community and industry, are learning all the time.

In reply to an earlier post on 19 Feb 2012 07:24:48 GMT
M. Carter says:
Could you suggest a better refactoring book?
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