Customer Review

9 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Oh dear am I the only one!, 29 Dec. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Women Who Run With The Wolves: Contacting the Power of the Wild Woman (Classic Edition) (Paperback)
Having read all the pseudo feminist clap trap about how great this is I bought it to read. I'm a psychologist so acquainted with the theories and models inherent within the book. What I became impatient with was all the pseudo feminine power claptrap. I get so fed up with women feeling the need to "empower" themselves etc. How insecure it makes us seem that we have to constantly find reasons to reach for the so called wild women inside. What about the wild person . I would have liked an explanation regarding what it is exactly since the inherent human (no mammalian) need to keep touch with our wild side is NOT a female need or imperative but a need for all living creatures. It becomes therefore a gimic to direct it to the eagerly awaiting female readership.I would also argue that most women are in contact with the wild as women can be as vicious as a she wolf if we would be honest enough to admit it . I find it pathetic to say that all daughters should be encouraged to read this. It's the old 'them and us' stance again. If all humans maintained their respect and links to the wild mammalian creatures that we are and accept how bad and vicious that makes us at times weather male or female we would increase the respect for all creatures and possibly not wish to continue our attempts to obliterate each other in wars etc. Wolf packs are very territorial, yet although the scapegoat they kill for meat and territory like most humans at war. We 'clever' apes have also become a bit warped and kill for more psychological reasons and that includes many many women. All mankind needs to reach the wild within and do away with the human need to destroy for psychological need and that includes rising above the need to do it for so called reasons of faith or possession . Mother nature is a wiley old bird and possessional /sex drives still rule us . Female instincts to nurture make us kid ourselves that we are the caring sex. Crap , male and female are essentially the same and ruled by drives mainly sex and survival. There's nothing wilder that seeing a female human fighting to keep her mate or protect her young . We humans are too superior or we think we are . Try feeling superior in the wilderness surrounded by real wolves/bears! Intelligence is relative . It's about time women stopped feeling the need to separate themselves as something special and men stopped doing the same for different reasons. Humans are humans the world over and our todrives will always remain the same. The book should have been about contacting the power of the wild human but I suspect strongly that it would not have sold as well. Feminism just like any other segregating dogma increases the possibility of making people feel supported and marginalises others . I found the book rather boring and very pretentious.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments

Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-4 of 4 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 24 Jan 2014 18:16:40 GMT
No, you are not the only one: I heartily agree. I dipped into the book to see if it was worth buying, and felt my heart sink.... florid, turgid and muddled - a complete turn-off. I just could not understand what all the rave reviews were about.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Jan 2014 14:45:16 GMT
Steffi D. says:
Hi there
That's a relief!!! I couldn't understand either what all the fuss was about. It's the power of marketing . Look at the "shades of gray" phenomenon . Give anything enough publicity, some good and people follow like sheep!!. I had to give SOG to the charity shop after the first few chapters. Just rather turgid boring porn!!
Regards
S

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Jan 2014 13:16:55 GMT
Hi,
Well, it's partly to do with marketing, also partly to do with the escalatory effect of the internet, I would think. SOG would probably never have made the NYT best seller list and crossed the Atlantic if it were not for social media. (I have not felt tempted to read it, by the way.)
The "wild woman" book has been around since 1992 and it did not impinge on my consciousness then. I only looked at it now because a non-native speaker of English told me she was reading it. I keep an open mind ("there are many things twixt heaven and earth not conceived of in your philosophy"). But as a linguist with a pretty good background in science (who has even read some Jung in the original German and also speaks Spanish) and being someone who thinks for herself, I simply object to phrases such as on p 475: "...the work strives to de-pathologize the instinctual nature, and to demonstrate its soulful and essential psychic ties to the natural world." This is partly trying to blind people with science and partly clothing common sense and old truths in mystique to make them sound more impressive. Moreover, trying to import the storytelling traditions from other cultures into industrialised society without turning the whole thing into a caricature is a pretty impossible task (a bit like the food in ethnic restaurants anywhere being a travesty of the food people really eat in the countries of origin). And one of the points that doesn't seem to be made (tell me if I'm wrong), is that in a wolf pack, just as in any animal - including human - society or community, there is a hierarchy and there are rules for the common good. Trusting your instincts is all very well, but the pack will turn on you if you step out of line.

On a humorous note, I found a quote here in a 1999 article about an avant-garde composer (Maria De Alvear) in the Village Voice:
"Among all animals, wolves hold a special place in the human psyche. "Man is an angry wolf," Custer is supposed to have said. No one makes films called Dances With Lemmings or writes books called Women Who Run With the Swine-both species, you'll admit, that human behaviour frequently brings to mind."

Regards
A.

Posted on 11 Jan 2015 12:02:00 GMT
[Deleted by the author on 11 Jan 2015 12:48:14 GMT]
‹ Previous 1 Next ›

Review Details

Item

Reviewer


Location: England

Top Reviewer Ranking: 731,265