Customer Review

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very unusual, yet simply superb!, 7 Nov 2003
This review is from: Sin After Sin (Audio CD)
Sin After Sin is often received with mixed emotions. Firstly, it isn't a commercial music product at all, which makes it fascinating. A masterpiece to be slowly digested. This album is one of Priest's most intriguing, yet brilliant productions. It touches many musical ranges... it is heavy (ie. the Sinner), brutally heavy (Dissident Aggresor), furious (Call for the Priest), soft and moody (Last Rose of Summer), atmospheric and soulful (Here Come the Tears), et all.
Rob Halford's vocals and lyrics are at their peak here. Glenn and KK's guitars are imaginative, skillful and impressive. Ian Hill's bass is... mmmh, let's better skip that with Simon Phillip's incredible drumming!! Until this day I still can't believe some of the prodigious and intricate drums parts he laid down for those sessions (sadly, he only acted as a session player). Simon started a whole thrashy drum movement with his dexterity in Sin After Sin. Roger Glover's production here is frequently critized for not achieving a heavier sound, but I disagree with that, as the end result is just what was needed musically.
The real beauty of Sin After Sin is that one can actually listen to many new subtle things each time one listens to it, no matter how many times played back... and that simply doesn't happen often these days. IT HAS MAGIC ALL OVER IT. This is a must item in any rock CD collection. A timeless classic!
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 21 Jun 2013 19:04:45 BDT
Last edited by the author on 1 Oct 2013 08:53:32 BDT
paul says:
Sin after Sin is indeed a fantastic album with lots of varying styles.I however must disagree with your rather unflattering comment on Ian Hills bass playing.It fits the album perfectly.Theres nothing dull about his playing on Sinner,Raw Deal or Dissident Aggressor.Ok,hes not the greatest player of all time,but the earlier albums did give him the scope to show what he could do.Listen to Stained Class or Unleashed In The East(studio) His playing on Tyrant is killer!! Despite being in Priest ALMOST since the beginning Hill has no ego.He leaves that to you know who!! This has meant that the songs have been written by the "egos" to showcase themselves.Dont get me wrong I have loved Priest for 30 years,even through the crud years,but I doubt messrs Downing Tipton and Halford were too concerned about what Hill was going to play when they wrote Ram it down!!(the song) Point is the songs weren't written by people who care about what the bass is doing.I can hear the egos now during the recording of British Steel" That's it Ian stay on the root note now for five minutes while we show off" Worst offender being Heading out to the highway on Point of Entry.My wife could play bass to that(as a bassist of 22 years im not joking)Hill has never been encouraged to "expand" his playing and their newer material Vegance,Faith,Turbo,Ram it Down were by products of the 1980s where we all played"spot the bassline!" Back in the day his playing was solid AND inventive,then due to the new writing style just needed to be soild.Tipton has been running the show for years and is only really interested in how good he looks and plays.Watch the Fuel for life dvd,its cringeworthy(he is a fabulous guitar player tho!!) I know Hill doesn't do much on stage but there is less than 30 secs footage of the poor bloke in the entire dvd. At the end of the day the bloke has kept his head down,earned his millions(unless the egos have put him on a salary) and made use of the talent he has.Hes better than you give him credit for.And no im not his son and ive never met him!!
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