Customer Review

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Apogee of British Counterculture, 12 Aug. 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: What A Bunch Of Sweeties (Audio CD)
Oh yes, 1972. You could barely go to an outdoor festival in those days and fail to see (or smell) the mighty Pink Fairies (even if they weren't on the official bill they were just as likely to set up their gear outside and create their own 'happening' for free). This sophomore effort was the album which almost brought them into the filthy capitalist mainstream due to it's top 40 placing, but Guitarist/Vocalist Paul Rudolph abruptly legged it soon after. This album is in much harder vein than it's predecessor (possibly due to blissed-out founder member Twink's absence) but just as crappily produced, but powerful songs such as Right On/Fight On maintained the band's alternative credentials whilst giving a foretaste of what was to come on the band's final L.P. - the proto-punk classic 'Kings Of Oblivion'. Their final album is by far the best of the three but this album has the most entertaining cover!. Polite message to Andy of previous review - Paul Rudolph did play bass for Hawkwind in 1976 on their awful 'Astounding Sounds & Amazing Music' album and Larry Wallis did play for Motorhead but left during the recording of their rejected debut album that was eventually released during Motorheadmania as 'On Parole'.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 16 Mar 2008 17:12:56 GMT
Last edited by the author on 16 Mar 2008 17:13:24 GMT
Don't write off astounding Sounds, "Steppenwolf" is a fine track (I've got to say that it's my wife's favourite 'Wind track and "The Aubergine That Ate Rangoon" would grace any Moussaka. Not to mention Calvert at his manic best on "Reefer Madness". Still, Paul Rudolph was a tad too funky for Baron Brock which led to Hawkwind's classic Quark Strangeness and Charm.

Posted on 17 Jul 2008 13:41:03 BDT
Sorry Geez - I still maintain that 'ASAM' was 'wind's Achilles heel between '70 and '78. It has a Janus-like feel to it which makes it sound as if it's trying too hard to be sleek and contemporary (for the day) while being unable to adequately shake off their previous hoary sound. This, to me, results in an aimless album that doesn't really know what it wants to be. Having said that, if its purpose was to serve as a precursor for the peerless 'QS&C' then it was worth being saddled with the reputation of being the lame duck in the 70's Hawkwind canon. I've tried to like it, I really have - but it just won't happen. Also factor in that I'm a bit too old to try different drugs now so I doubt if I can change my mind (or should that read 'have my mind changed for me'). Kind regards, Stephen Harrison - July 2008 (a bit late...)
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