Customer Review

107 of 115 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful image, but still butchered., 27 Jan 2010
This review is from: Thunderbirds: The Complete Collection [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
I don't own this set myself. However a friend does and after watching a few episodes, I have to agree that the blu-ray image is quite remarkable. It is still, however, a cropped and butchered image. This show was made in 4:3, broadcast in 4:3 and meant to be seen in 4:3. People will quite happily criticise widescreen movies that have been cropped into academy ratio. Why, therefore, should we be willing to accept the cropping of 4:3 material. I'm guessing that it would be very difficult to gauge the number of lost sales this set has suffered from based on it's incorrect ratio. But I'm guessing it's more than a few. If the publishers were to release a blu-ray version of Thunderbirds, in it's original ratio then I'd quite happily lay down my cash. However until that happens I'm quite content to stick with my DVD's.
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Comments

Tracked by 3 customers

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Showing 1-10 of 14 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 30 Jan 2011 02:58:31 GMT
MacAvity says:
Thanks for this. Before buying I will wait until they bring out a proper version.

In reply to an earlier post on 19 Nov 2011 08:25:21 GMT
MARK C. BALE says:
and there's no substantial extras are there (like the old 4:3 Carlton sets)

In reply to an earlier post on 1 Jul 2012 10:35:39 BDT
Last edited by the author on 9 Jul 2012 17:51:23 BDT
Steve says:
I believe that a lot of the problem is people do not understand how WideScreen in cinemas came about, back in the fifties cinema owners wanted a cheap way of getting a wider image on the screen

The 35mm release print image is a 1.37:1 'flat' Academy ratio format, but if you use an aperture plate in the projector with a roughly hewn oblong shape cut in the middle of it and hay presto! - You've got your self - `WideScreen' (1.85:1)

All of the TV crews that worked on the classic shows from the sixties (including Thunderbirds), all came from the film industry. Cinematographers would (and still do), compose all their camerawork for the WideScreen image, but `protect' the Full image from microphones and other filming equipment if the show they were working on was to be broadcast in Full frame or square

That is why shows from the sixties will work in both Full (1.33:1) and WideScreen (1.78:1) 'TV' formats

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2012 16:02:48 BDT
I must agree with Steve - this release is aimed at todays audience who are used to everything being widescreen. The cropping here is well done, in my opinion, and certainly looks better than stretching a 4:3 image to fit a 16:9 screen. The picture quality and sound are really very good for the age of the film. If you are unfamiliar with this material please don't be put off by the negative reviews - just enjoy the fun of the stories, you won't regret it!

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Jul 2012 21:21:46 BDT
Last edited by the author on 4 Jul 2012 21:32:15 BDT
Steve says:
Thank you for your comment,

Another example I can think of is from the film `Dirty Dancing', there is a scene in the film where the two main characters are walking across a fallen tree. Now when the scene was photographed, the sound man was in shot, lying on the ground holding up the microphone to record the actors' voices!

'Dirty Dancing' was photographed in a 1.37:1 `flat' Academy ratio format. The film is then cropped (as it is being viewed by a cinema audience), in the projector by means of an aperture mask in the projector's gate which is how the Widescreen (1.85:1) image is created, and is how the sound man miraculously disappears!

Cinema owners wanted a cheap way of getting a larger image- and you can't get cheaper than that!

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Sep 2012 18:34:06 BDT
Dr Zathras says:
Looks like it may soon be time to get your credit card ready. I see Amazon in Japan has announced a box set of all the Thunderbirds episodes in Blu-ray, restored and in the correct 4:3 aspect ratio. It's going to be released there in February 2013 so hopefully there will be a UK release about the same time. The same company is going to release UFO on Blu-ray 4:3 in December of this year so we'll get an indication what to expect in the picture and sound department.

Now, if we can just get somebody to release a proper copy of The World at War on Blu-ray....

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Nov 2012 09:19:52 GMT
footpedal says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on 22 Nov 2012 16:52:35 GMT
Is that what they've done? Unbelievable! I hope everyone demands their money back. Idiots.

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Dec 2012 19:02:12 GMT
Lambchop says:
How did you get ANY job with spelling like that.I had to read it 3 times to make sense of it.

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Jun 2013 23:06:42 BDT
footpedal says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]
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