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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Good for parents with newly diagnosed children but...., 1 Feb 2010
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This review is from: Managing Family Meltdown: The Low Arousal Approach and Autism (Paperback)
It has to be said, a bit of a diappointment. I have a twelve year old son with Aspergers Syndrome, and his "meltdowns" are devastatingly hard for the family to cope with. As this book had a promising title, I thought I would take the risk of buying it "blind". For anyone who is not already familiar with the background of children on the autistic spectrum, and for the usual hints about keeping to routine, recognising signs of approaching meltdown etc, this is fine, but doesn't go much further. I know there is no "magic wand book" out there to make all my problems go away, but I had hoped for more strategies from this one. It's fine to be told to keep calm and keep your voice low but when a chair is flying past your ear, it's hard to remember what the book says, let alone put it into practice.
If your child has a new diagnosis, you may find this book helpful. My copy is going to join the other books on the same subject, gathering dust on the shelf.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 6 Apr 2010 00:11:04 BDT
As an adult with Asperger Syndrome with 2 children with ASD's and working as a full time support worker with extremely challenging adults with autism, I would recommend that you persevere with the recommendations in this book. They do work, but require time and patience. I suggest you contact your local Child Adolescent and Mental Health Team for advice or speak to the ASD team at your local authority.

Posted on 27 Jun 2014 23:42:11 BDT
Mrs R Smith says:
Hello Leigh I have just been at the Autism Show in Manchester and had been advised to read this book by Andy McDonnell director of studio III after hearing him speak on challenging behaviour and one thing he talked about was a case where someone he was working with used to during his "melt downs" attack other people ie friends, family, carers around him but when they looked further into it they found out that the person doing the attacks during the "melt downs" when he was calm and un-stressed did actually like the people around him and did NOT want to hurt them but in the heat of the "melt down" could not help it as such so they worked with him on strategies and over 5 years he is now at the stage of throwing objects instead of attacking people during his "melt downs" which for him and those around him is huge progress. Do you think there is anyway you would be able to discuss and put in place stratagies with your son while he is calm and co-operative that he would learn to throw things that were smaller than chairs (based on the example you gave) and possibly soft as well to cause less damage? This would at least give you some progress and a sense of achievement and though far from perfect maybe 1 step closer to making everyone's life including your sons safer, better and happier? Don't know if you will see this message as it is 4 and a half years since your original post but if it does I hope it gives you some ideas. Thanks for your time. Please do not quote me on anything I said as it is just how I remember the session with Andy McDonnell going and is only my PERSONAL opinion nothing to do with his professionalism thanks a lot :)
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