Customer Review

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Seton's tale of of love, a lost city in the sky and a legend of a wall of gold, 26 July 2008
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This review is from: Foxfire (Paperback)
Foxfire is set in early 1930s depression era as slightly spoiled Amanda Lawrence meets the dark and brooding Jonathan Dartland (Dart) while returning on cruise from Europe. Despite Dart's poor prospects as a mining engineer, sparks fly and they are married and return to Lodestar, a mining operation in the remote back country of Arizona. Unused to the rougher aspects of life, Amanda has a difficult time settling in to her new life as well as mixing in with the mining community peopled with unusual characters -- from the alcoholic doctor Hugh hiding from his troubled past, the very mysterious Mrs. Cunningham, widow of the original 1880's boom town mine owner, who never leaves her huge mansion on the hill in the adjacent ghost town and more.

When Dart's half Apache mother dies, Amanda finds papers detailing a legend about two priests who discovered an ancient Anasazi cliff dwelling in the high country of Arizona with a glittering wall of gold in the cave behind it. Tensions between Amanda and Dart continue to grow as a miner whose scheme to murder Dart and take his job goes awry but ultimately disgraces Dart. With no career to look forward to, Hugh and Amanda convince Dart to lead them through treacherous back country to the lost city in search of the wall of gold - but Amanda and Dart eventually find a treasure in the valley much richer than gold.

Some readers might find the first half of this novel to be a bit slow paced as Seton sets up her storyline and details in the day to day life of a mining operation, but I enjoyed it very much. I have traveled quite a bit in the desert southwest and have always enjoyed taking the occasional mine tour or two and soaking in the history of those aging ghost towns. I very much enjoyed how Seton set up her scenes, especially the sights and sounds of the Sonoran Desert and the high country approaching the Mogollon (mug-e-yon) Rim. She must have spent a fair amount of time traveling through the region doing her research, I didn't catch a single gaffe in either her descriptions of the local towns, the geography of the region and the flora and fauna. I thought I was going to catch her if she kept describing the saguaros once her characters got into the higher elevations, but she was spot on. As stated previously, I enjoyed this book very much, but probably only for die hard Seton fans (and I am one) or for those interested in mining history and legends of lost gold. I see this book is due out in September '08 in a brand new edition and a beautiful new cover. Four stars.
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Showing 1-6 of 6 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 30 Jul 2008 18:42:46 BDT
Deborah says:
Thanks for this review Misfit - I read it a long time ago and may give it another try.

I was just looking into Dumas' novels and found your reviews there - very, helpful, thanks. I saw The Count of Monte Cristo in a bookshop the other day and was really tempted to give some Dumas a try - I can't believe I haven't read any before (and much as I enjoy the various films I guess they don't really count!). Having read the reviews, I'm going to try out The Count of MC, the Three Muskateers and, I think, The Black Tulip. That should keep me going for a while, especially as I'm also planning to start Dunnett's Niccolo series on CJ's recommendation.

In reply to an earlier post on 31 Jul 2008 12:04:08 BDT
Misfit says:
Hi Deborah I hope you enjoy Dumas. He's very similar to Dunnett so you should fare well. I'm going to get back into him again with the next in his Marie Antoinette/French Revolution (sp?) series. Hope you got the unabridged version of The Count of MC, long but worth it. You will be very very surpised how different the book is from the movies. If you like the Musketeers, there are four other books following ending up with The Man in the Iron Mask (another book Hollywood has bungled).

Next Dunnett for me will be King Hereafter.

In reply to an earlier post on 31 Jul 2008 17:27:34 BDT
Deborah says:
Good idea - my son is studying Macbeth for his GCSE, so perhaps I'll see if that's suitable for him (and then whether it is or not, I get to read it too!)

btw I voted this review as helpful, but I think it must've come up under the old edition?

In reply to an earlier post on 31 Jul 2008 17:27:59 BDT
Last edited by the author on 31 Jul 2008 19:49:22 BDT
Deborah says:
Good idea - my son is studying Macbeth for his GCSE, so perhaps I'll see if that's suitable for him (and then whether it is or not, I get to read it too!)

btw I voted this review as helpful, but I think it must've come up under the old edition?

ooh - that's odd, how did I do that?

In reply to an earlier post on 31 Jul 2008 21:15:25 BDT
Misfit says:
Nigel Tranter has a book about MacBeth also, Macbeth the King. I have it on the ever growing pile. There's also one out this year called Lady MacBeth. I gave it four stars, but it had some flaws. Feminine POV though :-)

I reposted the review because it didn't show up on the new edition of the book. Sometimes Amazon picks up the out of prints for the new editions and sometimes they don't. Seton's books are one of my biggest vote getters outside of Elizabeth Chadwick. Never would have got a blue badge at .uk except for her. My favorite author of medieval fiction, next best thing to time travel.

Posted on 25 Jan 2012 18:45:20 GMT
1930s NOT 1930's!
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Review Details

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3.8 out of 5 stars (4 customer reviews)
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Misfit
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Location: Seattle, WA USA

Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,897