Customer Review

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars interesting theories, 20 Jan. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: How the Mind Works (Penguin Press Science) (Paperback)
In Pinker's acclaimed how the mind works we are given a theory, one I find very persuasive, that the mind is a product of the brain. Pinker takes us back to evolutionary biology and shows how the brain developed and with it the mind. He shows by example how the brain has key functions of it's own, such as calculating the exact amount of pressure the grip must apply when picking up delicate objects, but also more abstrusely how the mind, as a product of brain function carries out it's business more perfectly than any machine can duplicate, or can it?

Pinker gingerly points to the fact that our brains are exactly like modern day computers. They have both evolved over the years, computer technology far faster than the brains evolution and artificial intelligence is coming along great guns. It may not be long before they think like we do.

This is quite a weighty book and Pinker goes in to some detail of why the mind is a product of the brain, for that reason alone it is well worth pursuing as it is accessible to the lay reader and I found myself able to 'follow Pinker's argument to conclusion satisfactorily.

The only real downside to this is, 1) It is a little dated now and advances in neuroscience may have altered some of the theories laid out in this book (I personally do not know) and 2) It is a weighty book, which Can put some people off even starting, but please do make the effort if you are interested in the arguments over brain/mind connection.

Overall an excellent read for those with a general interest in how the mind actually works, but we must accept that some of this book may well be overturned down the line, if not already.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments

Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 22 Sep 2011 13:40:16 BDT
[Deleted by the author on 22 Sep 2011 13:42:04 BDT]

Posted on 22 Sep 2011 13:41:49 BDT
Eileen Shaw says:
"...our brains are exactly like modern computers..."
Er, no. I don't think so. We don't even yet know exactly how our brains work. The analogy is false.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›