Customer Review

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Agony. Definitely Agony., 1 Dec. 2006
This review is from: Triumph Or Agony (Ltd.) (Audio CD)
I am a lover of 'film score' (read Elfman, Williams, Davis, Goldenthal etc.) and power metal. I am even a lover of Rhapsody.

Rhapsody of Fire however, have produced what can only be described as a lazy album void of any serious creativity or innovation. They have recycled many melodies from previous albums, knocked off various film soundtrack motifs without improving on the original creator's ideas, and gave nothing genuinely imaginative.

They were once the kings of orchestral music combined with metal, but their latest opus shows that they have left the door open for new bands to emerge in this field. Besides, despite being called 'Hollywood metal', their 'score' is so poorly orchestrated that it would struggle to meet the demands of a B-Grade fantasy film director, let alone the stringent expectations of Hollywood. The voicing isn't great (it's mostly poor) and the music is clearly written in sections and repeating blocks rather than in the proper evolving and flowing manner you'd expect of orchestrally-inclined music. The result for the end listener is pointless repetition and boredom. I suspect they had already reached their creative best in their previous release, and have released this half-arsed effort just to get across the change of name.

It was a disappointing release by any measure.

There are other bands (both emerging and established) that do the orchestral metal thing a LOT better and many of them look set to take the sound better places.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 24 Mar 2011 17:18:18 GMT
I agree with you about the possibility of Rhapsody running dry of ideas but your comment about orchestral music and the way it is expected to evolve slowly with no repetition or block writing isn't quite true of all orchestral music. In fact, the orchestral music the members of Rhapsody are interested in is from the Baroque and Classical period, when songs and concertos used to have lots of repetition. The slowly evolving music we know through film scores is mainly based on the Romantic period which came a bit later.
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