Customer Review

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A lot of information, but not particularly helpful., 24 April 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: How to Stay Alive in the Woods: A Complete Guide to Food, Shelter, and Self-Preservation That Makes Starvation in the Wilderness Next to Impossible (Paperback)
The next time I'm caught in an snowslide, I'll have to remember to "swim" through the snow while the avalanche is swallowing me up (and, of course, the backstroke will be the most effective).
This book is full of handy tidbits like that. Although I gleaned a few pointers here and there, I found most of the advice to be a tad outlandish. Have you ever tried to start a fire in the woods without matches or fire starters? It's not easy. But to suggest that it could be done just as easily during the dead of winter in a snow storm is ridiculous.
The author referred to "sourdoughs" several times. And, no, he wasn't talking about the bread. Apparently a sourdough is a kind of person (I still don't have that one figured out). That leads me to another comment about the book: The author's writing style has a lot to be desired. The sentence structure was very choppy throughout the book; this made for a difficult read. He writes in a different kind of English.....Canadian perhaps?
I'm glad this book was cheap. I would've been angry if I'd spent a lot of money on it. I think you can do better.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 11 Aug 2013 14:27:50 BDT
Dr. Zook says:
You might want to learn to use your computer to get your questions answered. The Google search engine and Wikipedia can be your friends.

1. Regarding Bradford Angier: Angier was born in the US but spent much of his life in Canada.

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradford_Angier

2. Regarding "sourdoughs": "Sourdough was the main bread made in Northern California during the California Gold Rush, and it remains a part of the culture of San Francisco today. The bread became so common that "sourdough" became a general nickname for the gold prospectors. The nickname remains in "Sourdough Sam", the mascot of the San Francisco 49ers. A "sourdough" is also a nickname used in the North (Yukon/Alaska) for someone having spent an entire winter north of the Arctic Circle and refers to their tradition of protecting their Sourdough during the coldest months by keeping it close to their body."

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sourdough

You're welcome. :)
‹ Previous 1 Next ›