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Customer Review

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The greatness and perfection of Julian Cope, 31 Aug. 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Collection (Audio CD)
The problem with newcomers to Julian Cope is knowing where to start - he seems to churn albums out at a rate of knots, regardless of whether or not he's got a record deal at the time. There have also been a handful of collections, of varying quality, but this is the best one to have appeared since the early '90s Floored Genius Volume 1. This collection sensibly tries to cover a shorter span of time (1984-1992), a period that was by turns incredibly productive and commercially successful. You'll find 1st post-Teardrop Explodes single, Sunshine Playroom (possibly the maddest, poppiest 3 minutes ever committed to vinyl) through to tracks from his controversially-titled (and last major label) album, Jehovahkill.
What shines through the entire collection is Cope's seemingly effortless ability to create esoteric songs that were at the same time incredibly hummable (Sunspots must be one of the few great pop singles based around an oboe!) There's been a tendency to avoid the more psychedelic (or just plain bizarre) album tracks and no B-sides whatsoever (unless you count the 12" mix of World Shut Your Mouth) but, as an incentive to seek out the further works of Julian Cope, it's as perfect as you could hope for. Genius? Maybe not, but it comes as close as you can get on a single Compact Disc...
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 5 Nov 2008 13:53:17 GMT
It's pointless comments like this...it's a singles sampler, that's all. What's the good of saying that Sunshine Playroom is "one of the maddest, poppiest moments committed to vinyl." What utter twaddle - listen to it on YouTube, along with its shocking David Bailey video. What's mad about it? Madder than Albert Ayler's Spiritual Unity and Brainticket's Cottonwoodhill? Poppier than... er... Sunspots, maybe!? (which is guitar chord-based). It's a $h1te song, it's musically very conservative - I'm not even sure it's that poppy! What's your agenda?
If you've got nothing to say, don't say it.
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