Customer Review

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sheer musical Genius, 18 Feb. 2006
This review is from: Radio Musicola (Audio CD)
It saddens and angers me that Nik Kershaw has never received the credit he so deserves. Radio Musicola was released in 1986 at what should have been the height of his career, after his incredible performance at Live Aid a year earlier and the mainstream sucsess of both Human Racing and the Riddle, Nik was on a roll musically. Radio Musicola saw Nik growing up as an artist, with the first single Nobody Knows having just tickled the top 40 and the album selling well at first but then fading it was clear Nik had outgrown himself, outgrown the teen idol that had ensured major sucsess in 1984 and 1985, I guess the music buying public just didn't get it!!
Without doubt this album is an absolute must for any aspiring songwriter, guitarist and music lovers in general, there is not a dull moment on Radio Musicola from the heart rending Life Goes On to the guitar virtuosity on What the papers say to the absolute sublime by the way of L.A.B.A.T.Y.D.
One day this man will be recognised as an icon for musicality and will be prepelled to where he belongs.
Buy this album, play it, love it and be proud that you know something the world has yet to wake up to.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 27 Jul 2013 04:53:39 BDT
But this rubbish happened all the time. Public decided to go against the great Kim Wilde in 1983, yet her third album is one of the best records ever made by anyone, and the best 2 German acts of the decade weren't allowed releases anywhere. The 80s made no sense, how can you start buying albums by people you love than stop a few years later, even though their standard of quality remains unchanged. Proof that teenagers and older people were sniffy idits back then. Yet in the 90s to now all the crappy acts are still here and get new dumb audiences every year so not outgrowing then. I swear Kershaw saw and heard the future with his summing up of the music scene on the song 'Radio Musicola' itself.

Most acts weren't seen or supported as ongoing ones, so no wonder he was dumped on this album, his twin Howard Jones got the same, though hung round a little longer. Nik also harmed himself-the gap of a full year between the first single and then the next two and the album itself would have been acreer-killing. The album sold dismally for him, making No.47 in a three week chart stay, yet worse was to come when 1989's "The Works" failed a placement altogther, but it was to be expected. Nonetheless the 2 singles from that-'One Step Ahead' and 'Elizabeth's Eyes' are two of his best ever.
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