Customer Review

30 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars British Comedy at its finest, 15 Mar. 2004
This review is from: School For Scoundrels [VHS] [1960] (VHS Tape)
This film is a showcase of British Post-war film making and the stars and production values that made it this way. Sims, Carmichael and Thomas excel in their roles as teacher, pupil and cad in this superb visualisation of Stephen Potter's writings on One-Upmanship. The film itself is stuffed full of stars of the era, Peter Jones, Hattie Jacques and Irene Handl to name but three. There isn't a duff performance from anyone.
Carmichael plays his usual middle-class English male marooned in a sea of indifference, power struggles and self-interest. However he has help this time. Guided by the wit and wisdom of Alastair Sim, he gains strength, confronts and battles his real-life demons to win the girl (played by Janette Scott, real-life daughter of the late Thora Hird).
I never cease to wonder at the ignorance of people who point-blank refuse to watch a movie just because it is shot in black and white. It saddens me that they deny themselves the pleasure of viewing classics like this.
This film is an excellent introduction to the genre of the British post-war film comedy. Buy it, buy it now.
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Showing 1-5 of 5 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 10 May 2010 10:31:36 BDT
I agree totally with this reviewer when he deplores the attitude of viewers who won't look at a film just because it's, as they say, 'in the old black and white'. The quality of many black and white films is exceptional and there are many which would lose by being filmed in colour. There's an intensity and a definition about many black and white films which is lost when transferred to colour. But - unless you have come to appreciate this - it's useless talking. Sometimes reviewers say silly things like 'Even though this film was made in the 40's, it's still quite good''. It's like saying 'Even though he wrote in the 16th century and in a different kind of English, Shakespeare is actually quite good'.
Eamonn Breslin

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Mar 2011 00:44:24 GMT
Yes I can`t get my kids to watch B/W films a bit like my attitude to silent films when I was a kid.

In reply to an earlier post on 15 Mar 2011 17:43:52 GMT
...I haven't tried it myself, but perhaps start them on Laurel and Hardy and then try 'Things to Come', with its war and rocket scenes.

In reply to an earlier post on 3 Jul 2011 15:06:33 BDT
Last edited by the author on 3 Jul 2011 15:08:52 BDT
And don't forget 'Very Important Person' ( 1960 ). An absolute corker of a British comedy!

In reply to an earlier post on 27 Jul 2011 16:08:36 BDT
I have also reviewed this on amazon and I have to respectfully disagree.
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