Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Listen in Prime Shop now Shop now
Customer Review

155 of 168 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Terrific Tale, 6 Aug. 2006
This review is from: The Thirteenth Tale (Hardcover)
This is, quite simply, a rattling good yarn and that is not meant to sound derogatory in any way. One of those unputdownable books that take the reader over from the first page and leave you feeling bereft at the end. The story has everything, twins, a governess, house on a remote moor, a governess, warring siblings, abandoned baby, a fire - from this, it is clear to see that the author loves Jane Eyre (in fact quotes and references to this book abound) and, in the general decay and characteristics of its inmates, we are forcibly reminded of Wuthering Heights. There is a sneaky reference to Henry James The Turn of the Screw that sets your thoughts off at another tangent, and, in case you think this sounds all too gloomy and gothic, there are descriptions of the grounds and the gardener that make you think of The Secret Garden.

So, a terrific read and I defy anybody buying this book not to be plunged into its world and to love it as much as I have done. It is going to be HUGE
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
  [Cancel]

Comments

Track comments by e-mail

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 31 Dec 2013 06:56:08 GMT
jkobi2011 says:
all the situations have been done before . There are Dickens' and Wilkins Collins' plots which are instantly recognisable. i dont even want to consider the Jamesian reference because I regard The Turn of the Screw as a failure.What does make the novel memorable is that it confronts the problem of the identical twins . This throws up the spectre Josef Mengele who permitted the survival of such twins at Auschwitz. What do you do where one seems to be growing up appreciating education whilst the other one seems to be out of control and rejects classroom discipline?. The author suggests that the Victorian approach was to separate them even though it made the so-called 'well-behaved 'one miissing the company of the rebellious one. In the end the writer gets our bt bringing in a third one . The reference to Wuthering Heights is to the ghost of the child in the window but that does not really get the reader very far. If the novel is about the growing up of identical rwins then the novel develops an original theme and the author is to be congratulated.

In reply to an earlier post on 31 Dec 2013 10:13:11 GMT
thank you for your really interesting post. I reviewed this book when it came out and before I started my blog else I might have said more but your post has said it beautifully. I recorded the dramatisation of it last night and shall be watching it and seeing what I think of it all.

Again, thanks for such an interesting comment
‹ Previous 1 Next ›

Review Details