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Customer Review

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Superb Violinist - Beware the Romance However, 3 Jun. 2014
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This review is from: Dvorįk: Violin Concerto / Romance / Mazurek / Humoresque (Audio CD)
As a huge admirer of Ms Mutter I was intrigued to hear this - in particular the Romance which is one of my all time faves. Much as I respect her this is an absolute mess - sloppy, lazy playing which takes all manner of liberties with the source material. Timing and tempo are erratic and she overindulges in unnecessary and showy trickery which adds nothing to the interpretation. Sorry but this sounds like something which was knocked out during a break in rehearsals.

If you want to hear this done properly check out any Czech Philharmonic rendition or the Baremboim/Perlman version which is sublime.
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Showing 1-5 of 5 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 19 Mar 2015 12:55:43 GMT
Glilla Bear says:
Could you provide some score references, please, so that we can see exactly where Ms Mutter is violating Dvorak's intentions?

In reply to an earlier post on 19 Mar 2015 17:15:56 GMT
rancidstoat says:
The review I posted was based on personal taste in terms of preferred interpretations rather than a forensic analysis of the score. I am not a musician but I know what I like and for me her version is as I described - to my ears at least. I suppose it is often the case that you tend to have a fondness for the first version you heard of a favourite piece although this does not mean necessarily that you might not come across a new recording which you prefer - for example latterly I have listened a lot to Valentina Lisitsa's rendering of various Liszt works which I think is truly spectacular.

As I say I am a huge admirer of Ms Mutter and I think her Bruch/Mendelssohn violin concerto readings are amongst the very best. However, I did find this recording somewhat jarring I'm afraid.

In reply to an earlier post on 19 Mar 2015 17:29:33 GMT
Last edited by the author on 19 Mar 2015 17:33:01 GMT
Glilla Bear says:
Many thanks for replying so quickly. You are quite right that tastes differ, and I have not heard Ms Mutter's recording of the Dvorak so I am not in a position to judge. I have a good collection of scores though, and if I hear in the concert hall something which disturbs me or surprises me, I do tend to rush to the score to see what is written there - although, of course, different editions differ.....! I heard Ms Lisitsa live in the Rakh (Rach) 3 and thought she had more going for her in terms of emotional voltage than in terms of technical prowess. She then floored me by giving as an encore quite the most ravishing (and technically sound) account of the Liszt transcription of "Die Junge Nonne" (Schubert) that I have ever heard. We are all blessed to be able to receive this from music, and more important than the score is to love (or not!) what one hears. All good wishes.

In reply to an earlier post on 19 Mar 2015 17:49:22 GMT
rancidstoat says:
You are so right. The beauty of classical music is beyond compare in terms of the emotional response it generates. In this sense whether you prefer one version to another is missing the point which is that we are all blessed as you say to have this available to us. For me this transcends everything else !

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Mar 2016 21:11:27 BDT
Ron Viewer says:
Having listened to excerpts on this and other websites, I tend to agree with you. The outer movement tempi seem hurried and excessively abrupt, while the slow movement crawls along with much exaggerated slurring or portamenti which mar the flow of this sublime melodic interlude.
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