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Customer Review

86 of 88 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great idea, lack of info. from Amazon, 12 April 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Kitchen Craft Re-Usable Non-Stick Grill Bags - Set of 3 (Kitchen & Home)
Here's the situation I was in... I love my steak - I'm a true carnivore. The steak I buy is quite bloody and even after draining, a lot is expelled during the cooking in my George Foreman grill and it's a real mess and a chore to clean up afterwards. I also use this to cook my chicken, but by the time it is cooked through, the outsides are burned to a crisp due to direct contact with the heated plates. These bags help in both situations and are a fantastic idea. I question just how re-usable these bags will actually be though as they look and feel like high quality food bags.

What annoyed me though was I assumed that all bags would be of the same size, large enough to cook toasties/paninis in. On the front of the packaging though it lists three sizes:

15cm x 20cm (ideal for sausages)
20cm x 20cm (ideal for hamburgers and vegetables)
25cm x 20cm (ideal for fish, large meat and paninis)

Nowhere does Amazon list this information (yet...) and in the title it just lists a set of three - so I assumed all would be the same size. The smallest one looks ideal for a slice of fish or a chicken breast but I can't think of much more use for it other than the recommended sausages.

Please note these are rated as being heat resistant up to 260 degrees centigrade so if you cook at higher temperatures these will likely melt, so please do avoid if that is the case. The instructions mention to wash in hot soapy water and to wash prior to first use, so really it's no different to how you hand wash dishes. There is a warning to not add any oil, butter or liquids to the bag, but on a plus note I would like to suggest that you start experimenting with spices, herbs & seasoning. In a grill like the George Foreman you don't really have that freedom as it just burns when it comes in contact with the hot plates, so these bags will allow you to add that little bit extra for a tastier meal.
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Showing 1-10 of 10 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 18 Apr 2012 19:52:01 BDT
I don't quite understand some of the points you are making:
"I'm a true carnivore ... The steak I buy is quite bloody and even after draining, a lot is expelled during the cooking ..."
Do you mean the steaks you buy are dripping blood, or even worse, sitting in one of those expanded foam trays with a 'cushion' in the bottom which has absorbed quite a bit of the steak's original weight in dripping blood? You also say, "... even after draining,..." Do you mean you need to drain your steaks before trying to cook them? If any of the above applies, a couple of suggestions which I hope you might find helpful: Bloody steaks which are dripping blood have usually come from beef which has not been properly hung. I use steaks from a local butcher and also a couple of online butchers and there is absolutely no sign of "dripping blood" from any of them. Indeed, the local butcher slaps the steak onto a sheet of greaseproof paper then wraps it in white paper. Imagine doing that with a "supermarket" steak and see what your shopping bag is like when you get home! The only time I have seen "dripping blood" is when buying steaks from most major supermarkets, and even their supposed "aged" steaks still exude blood and fluid when stored in the fridge. If you buy properly aged, hung for 21/28 days beef there will be no surplus blood to drip from it. The excess will have dried out and evaporated causing a great weight loss in the hung beef but that is why the customer pays much more for it. The flavour is absolutely concentrated "beef" and nothing but the beef, and well worth paying extra to enjoy such meat.
I am also something of a major carnivore, never mind a "true carnivore", and I learnt years ago the false economy of buying meat which is butchered and then on the supermarket chilled counter in a matter of a few days. (The same applies to bacon and even major supermarkets "dry cure" bacon exudes "white stuff" in the pan as compared to more expensive though properly cured bacon.)

In reply to an earlier post on 22 Oct 2014 08:55:14 BDT
Jakespa says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Nov 2014 12:29:37 GMT
TechLAD says:
Being vegetarian is your choice - and I'm sure a wonderful one at that - but your comment isn't adding to much here. Your comment comes across slightly condescending - I don't feel guilty eating meat and don't mind the mess it can sometimes cause... I hope one day you'll come to realise that eating meat is a choice I've made, and one I'm entitled to make. I have many vegetarian (and vegan) friends and we all have a complete understanding of one another.

PS. This review is fairly only now - these bags are long since binned as they became too tatty after a few months despite cleaning them well. If you don't mind replacing these every few months with moderate usage then they're a great product.

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Nov 2014 18:03:59 GMT
Jakespa says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Nov 2014 18:17:38 GMT
Last edited by the author on 6 Nov 2014 18:19:11 GMT
Do vegetables feel no pain? I'm sure I would not like to be a stick of living celery and feel the teeth of some "eater" (veggie/carnivore/omnivore) crunching through my living flesh, bursting cells hither and none, crushing my very fibres between their dastardly molars.

Oh no! I would sooner be a dead beast who led a decent life, then had a fairly peaceful death*, and was totally oblivious of what happened to my very fibres after I was gone.
*Think of the suffering of your veggie feasts! Uprooted in the prime of life; thrown into massive bunches by cheap labour pickers; chilled to the marrow to stop me spoiling; then picked, washed, fondled and [de]graded into various prices to show just how truly worth/worthless I am!
Then I end up on *YOUR* plate! Do you salivate and drool over me as I lie before you awaiting my fate?
And just how do you think I truly feel as your lips, teeth and oral cavity do their worst to my still living self!
Shame on you, you absolute veggie prevert!

A quick death in the abattoir is far preferable than the sordid scenes enacted daily in kitchens like yours!

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Nov 2014 18:33:40 GMT
Jakespa says:
Like a lot of "vegetarians" I do in fact eat fish.

In omitting to mention this, I unintentionally robbed you of the opportunity to expand your fantasizing, for which I apologise.

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Nov 2014 18:43:32 GMT
Now, you really are getting yourself into deep water.

I eat fish too and it does not bother me in the slightest that as they are hauled to the surface by trawlers, that they end up gasping for life as they are released from the nets, many species suffering ruptured swim bladders and other destroyed internal organs as they rapidly transit through the huge differences in sea pressures of the deep to the pressures of sea level.

As I say, it does not bother me as I have no real compassion for creatures of the Earth on which we feed, *EXCEPT* I would object to wanton, unnecessary cruelty.

As you boast you are "a vegetarian for compassionate reasons", how come your compassion only extends to the beasts of the field and not to the little fishies of the ocean?

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Nov 2014 18:59:40 GMT
Jakespa says:
Thank you for your interest.

I'm sorry for unnecessarily taking up a lot of your time.

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Nov 2014 19:30:50 GMT
I have all the time in the world, Jakespa, being now long retired, averagely healthy, and still enjoying the bounties of nature in all their shapes and forms.

Am I right in suspecting that your "dismissal" of the points I made, without you ever properly replying to a single one of them, means that in fact you have never, ever thought any of these points through for yourself? Again, but only a suspicion on my part, you do seem to be the classic "greenie/veggie" shouter who simply repeats slogans they have heard along the way, and your first input to this discussion did seem to confirm that: "I no longer eat food in the revolting state you both describe is a wonderful bonus."

Do tell! How is my revolting state of eating meat in any way different to your own revolting way of consuming fish?

I wonder how you feel about Global Warming? [Ooops! sorry! "Climate Change"!!!]

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Nov 2014 20:02:26 GMT
Jakespa says:
I'm sorry if I've given the impression that I was dismissing your points. It's just that none of them are relevant to my circumstances.

If only I had made it clear that I was "revolted" by such phrases as "The steak I buy is quite bloody," "it's a real mess and a chore to clean up" and "which has absorbed quite a bit of the steak's original weight in dripping blood," the subsequent speculation could have been avoided.
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