Customer Review

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars opinion from a psychologist, 14 Nov. 2010
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This review is from: The Quiet Room: A Journey Out of the Torment of Madness (Paperback)
I was looking for some insights from the "patient" perspective. I found the book very easy to read and quite interesting in some aspects, especially in the first chapters. It definitely is thought-provoking; however I found it too simplistic in the last part, where Lori's perspective tends to disappear, giving space to this "new miraculous medicine". It seems that any "happy ending" is exclusively connected to a medication, used as a sort of "deus ex-machina", and quite disconnected from Lori's path and consequential understanding.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 28 Nov 2012 12:27:35 GMT
Real'eyes says:
How ironic (and institutionally endemic) that a psychologists opinion should be slighted by the idea that Lori experienced a liberating sense of respite and remission during a period on medication.
That's because there's an underlying neurological process taking place that the language centres of the brain can't modify when someones psychotic. In fact those very areas are affected by the process itself resulting in the symptomatic presentation of expressive language deficits and thought disorder.
You may not like but to date no 'talking therapy' has had any effective utility among the acutely psychotic patient group.
Its great when they've stabilised and are able to restore a degree of retentive and expressive communication, but in many cases its medication which gets them there in the shortest time period, along with a reduction in the distress so typically associated with an individual experiencing such chaotic shifts in neurological activity.
All that aside, take Lori's account on its a fantastic and necessary insight from someone who knows and is able to evoke the inner-world of this condition.

In reply to an earlier post on 11 Jul 2014 01:08:56 BDT
marianbg says:
"You may not like but to date no 'talking therapy' has had any effective utility among the acutely psychotic patient group." Nonsense. Finnish Open Dialogue, among other non-medical approaches to so-called "psychosis" like Loren Mosher's Soteria House for instance, has a recovery rate of 83%, full recovery. Also I wonder what kind of "underlying neurological process" you are referring to, as there's no such process documented in the scientific literature. "Psychotic" brains work just like yours and mine.
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