Customer Review

53 of 55 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking and excellent read!, 14 Sept. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Nervous Conditions (Paperback)
This book opened a window for me into the lives of black African women who manage to gain an education especially at a time in Southern Rhodesia when to be black was to be bottom of the heap and to be female as well was even less advantageous.
The book tells a story of how an African girl surmounts the apparently insurmountable in a patriarchal society to gain an education. The influences of the other significant women in her life, supportive or otherwise and the ultimate affect of that education on her relationships within an African society.
I went to school with the author although she was a year ahead of me. I was a 'European' colonial from Zambia. Tsitsi stood out at school for her brains and her posh English accent which in Southern Rhodesia at that time was a considered a matter worth commenting on. Given the politics at the time - the early seventies during UDI - within the country as well as within the school I was keen to read her book when I heard she had written one. I was not disappointed. The book offered some thought provoking insights into a world that was closed to us white girls despite the multi-racial nature of the school.
I can highly recommend it to anyone who is interested in women's issues and racial issues.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 5 May 2010 10:56:03 BDT
Emer Mullen says:
The personal connection with the author is interesting although perhaps a red herring at the end of the day. I am just beginning to explore African literature and it was helpful to read that this book looks into the issue of women in africa and their experience in a patriarchal society. From that point of view this review would encourage me to look into this author's work.
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