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Customer Review

5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Patchy, 5 Aug. 2009
This review is from: Days To Come (Audio CD)
I really liked Animal Magic and Dial M, so had high hopes for this. It's a strange one though- for the first half of the album he seems to be trying to write the soundtrack to a samurai movie. All very Japanese sounding, which wears thin pretty quickly. The second half is more similar to the earlier albums only not as good. The only time he really gets it right is on the last track 'Recurring', which is a great tune.
There are vocals this time too, but more often than not they feel grafted on and not a part of the song. Some rather trite lyrics don't help either.
Overall the whole thing just feels forced, and not a patch on his other work.
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Showing 1-7 of 7 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 6 Feb 2011 14:50:46 GMT
Last edited by the author on 6 Feb 2011 15:27:30 GMT
Sual Babby says:
Your review is very misleading.

It's Indian, not Japanese. Although it has found strong ideological footings in Chinese and Japanese historical backgrounds, Buddhism (as is the album's thematic dialogue) actually originated from India.

The album is therefore largely influenced by Indian culture, and Bajka herself hails from India. It's evident even in the instrumentation. If this album were a soundtrack, it'd be more suited for a Diwali festival than a Chanbara flick.

Before reading this review I never noticed that the album does branch out a little midway through (a few songs have been distinctively interspaced with genres more familiar to those of the house music diaspora), but I think you might've found it a little more enjoyable if you had been accurate about the album's influences to begin with.

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Feb 2011 15:01:03 GMT
Andy Barnard says:
Fair enough. India it is. My point was that it's bland and samey.

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Feb 2011 15:43:48 GMT
Last edited by the author on 6 Feb 2011 15:54:28 GMT
Sual Babby says:
How does it change the fact that you've obviously commented on something you wouldn't even care to understand? Please note, I'm trying to avoid having to say that I object to your review because it's a criticism of Bonobo's work; instead, I'm objecting because I think you couldn't care less about how it sounds because it doesn't sound the same as his previous work. Your point is based on a lazy observation.

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Feb 2011 16:01:11 GMT
Andy Barnard says:
I prefer the term 'demotivated'. Possibly even 'apathetic' or 'shiftless'. Lazy is hurtful.

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Feb 2011 16:03:02 GMT
Last edited by the author on 6 Feb 2011 16:21:37 GMT
Sual Babby says:
I don't mean to sound rude, but especially considering that I didn't say it with the purpose of being spiteful, then why should I care if my description is hurtful? The argument isn't even about laziness as an inaccurate description so I'm well within my rights to say so. Lazy review was lazy. You probably just made it on a whim, didn't you? There is no difference between the word I chose and the words you prefer because it all arrives at the same conclusion.

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Feb 2011 18:13:08 GMT
Andy Barnard says:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humour

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Feb 2011 18:38:39 GMT
Sual Babby says:
I'll know it when I see it. Thanks for trying though. :P
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