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Customer Review

50 of 53 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Quadrophenia DVD - let down by poor mastering!, 10 Nov. 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Quadrophenia [DVD] [1979] (DVD)
As stated in other reviews, this DVD suffers badly from poor mastering. A couple of years ago, this film was remastered for a theatrical release with Quadrophonic sound - this is not present on this disc. The DVD version is simply a mediocre transfer of the recent VHS release. In addition to the other complaints mentioned I must add three other major complaints about this disc.
1) Hum bars. At some stage in the mastering, there has been a source of interference which results in inch wide hum bars travelling up and down the screen for the duration of the film. Not noticible so much during bright exterior shots but terribly distracting for darker scenes. Please note: These hum bars are not on the VHS equivalent of this release so obviously, the original mastertapes are fine.
2) Lip synch seems poor in places
3) There is a nasty jump cut not seen on any of the previous releases for this title. It occurs during the beach fight scene where Chalky is jumped upon. This jump cut may be hiding an otherwise smooth and unnoticible switch to the dual layer portion of this disc but I'm not so sure. On both my players, the scene jumps.
It's a shame that this disc is so flawed. The menus are good and the movie itself is outstanding. This would make an acceptable 'budget-priced' disc but at the time of writing, this disc is still retailing at full price which leaves a bitter taste in the mouth.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 6 Nov 2012 14:37:54 GMT
D. T. Looser says:
No film has ever had a cinema release with a quadraphonic sound mix as such mixes lack the all-important screen centre channel. The nearest approximation was the "Quintaphonic" sound system used for the initial 1975 release of "Tommy"; this used the combination of a quadraphonic system (Sansui QS matrix) with a discrete centre channel. However this system relied on expensive magnetic-sound film prints and was never used again. "Quadrophenia" used the Dolby Stereo system which by 1979 was well on its way to becoming the de-facto standard sound system for 35mm film prints. Dolby Stereo uses a 4-channel (left, centre, right & surround) mix which is fed through the Dolby Stereo (aka Dolby pro-logic) matrix so that it can be recorded on two optical soundtracks on the print. In the cinema a Dolby Stereo decoder recovers the 4 channels. The early DVDs of "Quadrophenia" used this soundtrack so anyone who fed it through a pro-logic decoder would have heard the original cinema mix.

From the mid 1990s onwards almost all film prints intended for cinema release have also carried a digital 5.1 sound mix in either Dolby Digital, DTS or SDDS or, most commonly, all three. In addition they also carry an analogue Dolby SR stereo soundtrack as a back up. Any 21st century re-release of "Quadrophenia" would have either used the original Dolby Stereo mix, a 5.1 digital one, or both.
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