Customer Review

47 of 89 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Nonsense designed to sell books., 19 Feb 2006
By A Customer
This review is from: Supernatural: Meetings with the Ancient Teachers of Mankind (Hardcover)
I am a paleoanthropologist. It is my job to research and to attempt to explain stone age rock art and engravings from Southern Africa.
And this book is awesomely, embarrassingly bad.
There are perfectly good explanations of southern African rock art to be found in thousands of pages of documented and finely-sifted ethnology, most of which accords with ethnology from South America and Australia. Graham Hancock, I see, has decided to substitute this easily available stuff with theories about, um... aliens.
Read David Lewis-Williams' 'The Mind in the Cave' or Neil Bennun's 'The Broken String' instead of this, because this truth is both much better written and even more amazing than this nonsense. \
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Showing 1-5 of 5 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 16 Sep 2009 14:47:08 BDT
Sd Sanders says:
A book, designed to sell books?

Wow.

Posted on 3 Dec 2010 15:30:58 GMT
R. W. Ward says:
Well, if you're a paleoanthropologist, then I suppose that must mean Graham Hancock's books is nonsense, as you say. Thank you for clearing that up. It's comforting to know you guys are out there.

Posted on 23 Aug 2011 04:04:25 BDT
Last edited by the author on 23 Aug 2011 04:12:15 BDT
Sam Iam says:
When someone announces up front in their review that they are some kind of expert I always get cautious. Like they are expecting readers to accept what they say via their credentials regardless of facts and reasoning.

You mention "The Mind in the Cave" by David Lewis-Williams. Have you read that book?! It's major thesis is that the early cave drawings are the result of shamans experiencing altered states -- exactly what Hancock posits in the book (and he gives due credit to Lewis-Williams).

Posted on 29 Aug 2012 21:55:06 BDT
Mr paleoanthropologist, it's OBVIOUS you haven't read Hancock's book, as you said "...Graham Hancock, I see, has decided to substitute this easily available stuff with theories about, um... aliens...".

Which is a completely false statement.

Posted on 18 Mar 2014 13:40:29 GMT
Chev Chelios says:
"I am a paleoanthropologist. It is my job to research and to attempt to explain stone age rock art and engravings from Southern Africa." Ok then, how about you offer us an explanation? Take the time to write your own book and bless us all with the wealth of your knowledge? The problem with "I am a plaeoanthropologist" is that you are immediately closed off to any other input outside your small window of expertise and any ideas (particularly from amateurs in the field-I mean how dare they? They are not experts?) that doesn't fit into the conservative and orthodox model of current paleoanthropolgy is haughtily brushed aside.
"And this book is awesomely, embarrassingly bad." You might not have liked it but you don't have a monopoly on taste and sensitivity-I'll make up my own mind if that's alright by you?
"There are perfectly good explanations of southern African rock art to be found in thousands of pages of documented and finely-sifted ethnology, most of which accords with ethnology from South America and Australia." Back that up with some evidence please, as Hancock does. And at no point in the book does he honestly suggest that rock art was created by aliens. This comment just come across as petulant and touchy, like you are just some charlie big potato flat earther expert having a big huff .
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