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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A little caustic, but quite interesting, 7 Oct. 2008
This review is from: The Armchair Economist: Economics and Everyday Life (Paperback)
If you're anything like me, you enjoy reading interesting subject matter written by a passionate author, and whilst this book certainly counts as such, it isn't without its flaws. Steven Landsburg provides an introduction to the field of economics for the uninitiated, and then walks us through various unlikely and often entertaining consequences of viewing the world through an economist's eyes.

At the moment I can't seem to get enough of pop-economics, and this book, being billed as the progenitor of the breed, seemed a little too irresistible. Published as it was in 1995, the material is starting to show its age, but its examples are still very relevant. Far more distracting is the author's tendency to sensationalise his assertions before justifying them. The entire book would read better if the audience were allowed to digest the enormity and validity of his proposals for themselves.

If you were looking for a lay introduction to the subject of economics, I'd recommend Tim Harford's Undercover Economist, which is intrinsically more pleasant to read. If that whets your appetite, you might want to continue with this.
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Initial post: 27 Sep 2012 03:46:53 BDT
I have Harford's Undercover book and I agree on it's readability, but it can get a little dense and over jargony at times, particularly the section on the 2007/8 crash. Peter Schiff seems to be more lucid on that part, even Stephanie Flanders in her BBC programme on Hayek: The Money Masters, where she traces it's origins back more fundamentally to 2001 and earlier to FDRs days.
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