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118 of 126 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "How one Man Saved the Monarchy"..., 28 Nov. 2010
This review is from: The King's Speech: Based on the Recently Discovered Diaries of Lionel Logue (Paperback)
In lieu of being able to watch the movie "The King's Speech" because it hasn't been released yet, I ordered the book by the same name, written by Lionel Logue's grandson, Mark Logue, and his co-author, Peter Conradi. The book is a well-written biography of Australian-born speech therapist Lionel Logue and his work with Britain's Prince Albert when he was Duke of York in the 1920's and continuing on in the 1930's when "Bertie" became King - George VI - in 1936, and then afterward during WW2.

Albert, son of King George V and younger brother of Edward VIII, had developed a stammer during his youth, which made him shy and uncommunicative. As someone who has struggled all my life with a relatively mild stutter, I thought it was good that Mark Logue did not attribute the cause of Bertie's stammer to any one thing. Stuttering is an impediment which seems to arise from both/either physical and psychological reasons and most of the time cannot be properly ascribed to any one thing. In Bertie's case, it was possibly from a difficult youth. He and his siblings were not close to their parents - as was common in those days - and his parents seemed to rather scare him when they were together. A sadistic nanny and the changing of his left-handedness to right may have contributed to his stutter. In any case, he was a man who could not always control his own speech, and he was moving into some situations where he would be called on to speak publicly and to do so often.

After his marriage, Bertie consulted Lionel Logue who had emigrated to England from Australia with his wife and young family and set up a practice in speech therapy in London's Harley Street. After much practice, Bertie was able to give speeches, but he depended on Lionel Logue's continued help as he became king - first in peacetime and then in wartime. The many speeches by radio that George was called on to make in the 25 or so years of his rule were always difficult for him, but Logue's work made them bearable to the king. Logue and George VI became friends - of a sort - because of their work together.

Mark Logue and Peter Conradi were able to look through Lionel Logue's case files and put together a very good record of Logue's work with George VI. Whether Lionel Logue "saved the monarchy" is a bit in doubt, but he did give confidence and success to the George VI when he - and the nation and the Commonwealth - needed it the most.

A note to the authors, Wallis Simpson was from Maryland, not Pennsylvania.
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Showing 1-10 of 19 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 14 Dec 2010 15:39:38 GMT
Last edited by the author on 14 Dec 2010 15:55:11 GMT
ALVARO says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on 2 Jan 2011 12:51:48 GMT
E Jay says:
Bit confused by your comments. I thought that it was Prince Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick nickname David who went on to become Edward V111, who abdicared. It is true that he was fond of Germany after staying in his youth with his german cousins one of who became the King of Wurttemburg. In 1935 he was rebuked by his father for his warmth and a public declaration of friendship with Germany,but it was his sex life and not politics which worried the powers that be more. He had several lovers over 20 years mostly with married or divorced women, but he fell in love with Wallis Simpson and it was for her he abdicated in 1936.

In reply to an earlier post on 6 Jan 2011 17:20:48 GMT
Dick Pearson says:
ALVARO - Your views are your own - a minority, I suspect - but you might at least get a little accuracy into your diatribe. It was Albert's brother David, later Edward VIII, who was the Nazi sympathizer and who abdicated.

Edward VIII was not alone at the time, however, in his admiration for the fascist movement as many from all walks of life and social stratas were similarly impressed. Most, however, once the subsequent conflict started did their utmost to combat and defeat Hitler, and were horrified in the way the movements they had admired became truly evil.

In reply to an earlier post on 11 Jan 2011 12:13:39 GMT
ALVARO says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on 11 Jan 2011 12:30:44 GMT
Last edited by the author on 11 Jan 2011 19:21:26 GMT
ALVARO says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Jan 2011 14:02:27 GMT
E Jay says:
What's Edward V11 got to do with it???? He died 1910, he didn't abdicate.

Posted on 15 Jan 2011 12:07:15 GMT
V. Hannides says:
Wallis Simpson was born in Pennsylvania on the Pennsylvania/Maryland border, so this may be what the book refered to.

ALVARO. It's only a book, get over it.

Posted on 15 Jan 2011 14:04:35 GMT
When i was a child I had a cripling stutter, so my poor, desperate mother took me to see 'the man who cured the King.' I remember he was Australian, had white hair - and gave me endless breathing exercises. This meant I could skip morning chapel. I breathed, while my friends sang and prayed! I don't know whether he helped me as such - i found my own way in the end, aged about 17, but maybe he set me on the right route. Who knows?

In reply to an earlier post on 17 Jan 2011 19:49:38 GMT
Dick Pearson says:
ALVARO - So you don't believe in "exploitation, reverence, pomp, saluting flags and all that old rubbish" - well apart from the exploitation bit quite a lot of us do. It has also been my experience that people who say they don't also do but merely have a different set of people they elevate without due cause- such as pop stars. actors, sport stars, shallow but charismatic politicians etc.

Did you even read the book before your diatribe? It was actually quite fascinating and a good read.

In reply to an earlier post on 27 Jan 2011 09:51:48 GMT
Mrs Daniels - thank-you for sharing that!
Quite the antidote to the senseless bickering in the posts/reviews above. I hope you have been to see the film now, and enjoy the representation of Lionel given by Geoffrey Rush.
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