Customer Review

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read, 23 Mar. 2008
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This review is from: 1001 Inventions: Muslim Heritage in Our World (Hardcover)
This is one of my favourite books. It gives ample information about Muslim contributions to the world from Iraq, Iran, India, China, Turkey, Spain, etc. and has information in seven sections regarding inventions relating to the home, school, hospital, city, world and universe. In addition to this, there is a section at the end with biographies of Muslim scientists and explorers, a timeline and a map of Muslim contributions. All of this is easy to read and well laid out with many picture illustrations.

Furthermore, although the main author of the book is Muslim, he frequently references and quotes non Muslims who have acknowledged the Muslim contributions, including TV presenter and author Adam Hart-Davies, presenter of "What the Ancients Did for Us", who even wrote a positive review for the book.

I would definately recommend this book to anyone, Muslim or not, not only to inspire them but also to bring an awareness of this broad heritage that is often neglected. I am grateful that such efforts have been made to revive this heritage.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 4 Mar 2010 15:50:10 GMT
Midasin says:
Dear Shadow,

It is well-known that rulers of empires pull together strands of knowledge which are useful to them from different sources and cultures. Naturally, some of the Muslim empires were among these. But I think some balance is required here.

Did you know the numerals English speakers call "Arabic" are called in Arabic "al-Hindi" because they were invented by people from India who were not Muslims?

Did you know that the translations of Greek texts into Arabic were made by Syriac-speaking people who were members of both the Church of the East and the Syrian Orthodox Church? The most famous of these was Hunayn bin Ishaq (809-873). These people were non-Muslims, but their services were utilized by Muslims. Muslims (while still in the minority) were taught by them. But later, when Muslims became a majority in these countries, the posts were filled by Muslims and other people, however skilled, were forced to accept secondary posts.

The same applies to Jewish medical practitioners and inventors, etc.

Of course, Muslims made scientific and mathematical contributions, but many of the inventions developed in the Arab world came from nonMuslims who were were granted only secondary status in the Muslim world.

I only write this as I think there is a danger of going over the top here.

All the best, Midasin.
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