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Customer Review

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Enlightening..., 25 Mar. 2008
This review is from: Talk to the Hand: The Utter Bloody Rudeness of Everyday Life (Paperback)
The bizarre thing about this little book, and all the anger on it's pages, is that it has had the completely opposite effect on me to what I imagined it would!
I can be an angry person with the rest of them, while also being prone to being irritated by the rudeness and inconsideration of others. I have also had the odd sway into feelings of road rage (Sorry - but that person that pulls out on you in a 60mph limit and proceeds to dawdle along at 25mph will ALWAYS have me reaching for my imaginery dashboard mounted machine gun. You know who you are.) And I too, am irked by other people chatting in the cinema and the very loud, somewhat uneccessary use of mobile phones.But I found myself, rather than shouting 'Yes, thats right - I feel just like that' aloud while reading LT's prose, I found myself instead thanking the good Lord that I'm not as irritated as she appears to be! How tiring!
So, actually, reading this book can be good for your health. It can make you realise how much worse off other people are. Or, in contrast, it can be bad for your health as you reach the conclusion that perhaps you are the irritating as opposed to the irritated...
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Showing 1-7 of 7 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 29 May 2010 23:10:02 BDT
B. Williams says:
I am incandescent with rage at young people's selfishness and complete lack of awareness of the rest of the the human race. This lack of awareness manifests itself thousands of times a week - on trains, buses, shops, pavements, restaurants, open spaces. I have 4 children of my own, born between 1974 and 1984, and they are all aware of everyone else - they are not of the cosmic view that 'I MATTER, YOU DON'T' They have grown up learning to be aware of all others, not always to defer to them, but to listen to them. They have mobile phones but I have always observed them using them in situations where their every word could not be heard -not with that loud, ME ME ME voice that invariably ends up saying 'OK yeah here's my stop talk to you in a minute' so you are left thinking that the whole inane whiffling non-talk was just to cover that silence or to impress the other passengers that you have a friend and that every moment must be filled - don't, ever, get out a book and read on the bus. Just trill on about moronic nonsense that everyone has to hear - and don't be surprised if the bus load heaves a great sigh of relief when you get off at your stop, and collectively wonders why on earth that juvenile, dull and very low quality call had to be made.
And why is it that so many mobile calls end with that stupid combination 'LOVE YOU!! SEE YOU IN A MINUTE!!'
Can't anybody hand write a letter to another person, pen and ink, no text shortcuts, put it in an envelope, buy a stamp, address the envelope properly, and give someone the sheer joy of having a hand-written letter put through their letter box? There must be a Society around somewhere to promote this. When I was young I did that all the time. My children do both - the text and the hand written letter. The hand written letter always gets the better reception. To us, the postman delivering a letter to your door cannot be surpassed.
This is support for |Lynne Truss if she ever reads it.

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Jul 2010 10:54:40 BDT
I find that invariably, when a mobile goes off at some really important point, such as in a play, or a posh dinner, it's someone over 50 fumbling in their bag. I think people over 50 don't actually know how to put their phones on 'vibrate', a skill most teenagers learn the moment they want to take a banned mobile to school...

In reply to an earlier post on 19 Dec 2010 12:44:32 GMT
I. MCGREGOR says:
Dear, oh dear! I am in my eighties and I laughed aloud as I read this book. Get a mental tuning fork, B. Williams. Can't you tell that Lynn Truss is wryly laughing at her own reactions to the "bloody awfulness" of modern life? 50% laughing and 50% denouncing - the most effective way of making people sit up and take notice. Remember Chaplin's "The Great Dictator"?

This is not quite as good as "Eats, Shoots and Leaves", but good enough for me to send for Christmas to friends who can appreciate it. Iona McGregor

In reply to an earlier post on 19 Dec 2010 12:45:47 GMT
I. MCGREGOR says:
Dear, oh dear! I am in my eighties and I laughed aloud as I read this book. Get a mental tuning fork, B. Williams. Can't you tell that Lynn Truss is wryly laughing at her own reactions to the "bloody awfulness" of modern life? 50% laughing and 50% denouncing - the most effective way of making people sit up and take notice. Remember Chaplin's "The Great Dictator"?

This is not quite as good as "Eats, Shoots and Leaves", but good enough for me to send for Christmas to friends who can appreciate it. Iona McGregor

Posted on 11 Jan 2012 15:55:49 GMT
Last edited by the author on 11 Jan 2012 15:58:37 GMT
JJA Kiefte says:
Hey, Little Reader,

I would respectfully suggest you read Lynne's book "Eats, Shoots and Leaves", and then commence the uphill task of correcting the puntuation errors riddling your review.....

Regards,

Joost

In reply to an earlier post on 11 Jan 2012 17:47:33 GMT
Last edited by the author on 11 Jan 2012 17:53:33 GMT
LittleReader says:
Hey, JJA Kiefte
There's nothing quite so brilliant as being tripped up royally when behaving with such MASSIVE smugness... I am loving that you didn't put a 'c' in the word punctuation. Perhaps while Im sorting out my 'puntuation', you could work on your spelling hehehehe :o)

In reply to an earlier post on 12 Jan 2012 19:30:31 GMT
Last edited by the author on 12 Jan 2012 23:35:01 GMT
JJA Kiefte says:
Touché.....
But to counter your mirth: punctuation is something you have either mastered or not and is not in the same league as a typing error. And yes, I know I'm (or should that be "Im"?) being a pedant here. Which gives you an example of the correct use of the present continuous and not the MacDonald's variety.
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