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59 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars an excellent new history, 15 Aug 2009
This review is from: The Storm of War: A New History of the Second World War (Hardcover)
As we reach the 70th anniversary of World War Two's beginning, this is a first-class new general history of the conflict. Roberts writes with clarity and enthusiasm: his survey is wide-ranging and thoughtful and full of fascinating insights. The focus is on Axis war strategy, and using fresh archive material, Hitler's blunders are put under the spotlight - particularly his invasion of the Soviet Union, and - once the tide of war had turned - his dogmatic orders to hold every scrap of occupied territory, denying the German Wehrmacht all tactical flexibility. At the heart of the book is the simple yet powerful truth that the hateful race prejudices of the Nazis ultimately undermined their military efforts - but Roberts also pays proper and moving tribute to the courage of those who stood fast against them.
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Showing 1-5 of 5 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 4 Sep 2009 17:46:21 BDT
The information that Hitler blundered by invading the Soviet Union is not new. The Bulgarian government, the Japanese General Staff and General Douglas MacArthur could have told anyone this on June22nd 1941. Perhaps more interestingly, they could equally have told you on June21st.

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Sep 2009 13:08:48 BDT
Last edited by the author on 21 Sep 2009 08:22:40 BDT
I think your mention of the Japanese General Staff is rather unfortunate. Had they simultaneously attacked Russia in the East, following Hitler's 'Operation Barbarossa' in the West; rather than turning south to attack America at Pearl Harbour, it is highly probable that Stalin's Soviet Empire would have gone down by the end of 1942.

In reply to an earlier post on 2 Oct 2009 15:04:58 BDT
The lack of co-ordination between the Germans and Japanese is a topic covered [well in my opinion] by Andrew Roberts in this book.

Posted on 2 Nov 2009 16:21:30 GMT
K. N. Crosby says:
Perhaps Roberts has overlooked the findings synthesised by Adam Tooze.

Posted on 8 Jan 2010 14:44:34 GMT
Marcus Laver says:
Reading Victor Suvorov's explosive latest book 'The Chief Culprit' it becomes clear that Stalin would have attacked Germany anyway in 1941, and the German attack was pre-emptive. I can't believe that there are people who still believe the myth that Barbarossa was unnecessary from the Axis point of view - far from it. The real strategic blunder from the Axis was made by Japan: Pearl Harbour - it guaranteed Axis defeat by involving the world's most powerful industrial nation. A Japanese attack on Siberia would have doomed the Russians, who were not logistically capable to fight an effective two front war over such huge distances.
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