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Customer Review

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars excellent writing, 14 July 2010
This review is from: The Forbidden Rose (Berkley Sensation Historical Romance) (Mass Market Paperback)
I absolutely loved Joanna Bourne's first novel The Spymaster's Lady and adored the hero and heroine who were entrancing. Her second one was good but not as good. This third novel is as beautifully written as the first two and set in the same era, the French Revolution. It is a prequel to the first novel and therein lies a small problem. Because it has exactly the same plot and the hero and heroine are virtually identical to those in the Spymaster's Lady. But they are not quite as absorbing. It's as if a painter duplicated a much-love painting but the colours were not quite as vivid. Having said that, she does not make the mistakes other American authors do -- fall instead of autumn, cent instead of penny, marketing instead of shopping etc. So I was intested to note she acknowledges two specialists in historial language. If only her fellow-authors followed suit. The writing is so much better than others in the same genre that it is a delight to savour and I would definitely encourage anyone interested in spy-romances to read her books.
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Showing 1-7 of 7 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 19 Apr 2011 14:00:15 BDT
Fall is not inaccurate. It's a word that would have been used here at the time. It's been retained in American English but not in UK English. Just so you know.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Apr 2011 18:39:47 BDT
Thanks for this intriguing information, Mrs Staniford. Having read Georgette Heyer's books I've never seen Fall mentioned instead of Autumn and as you know she was a stickler for research but I will take your word for it. Anyway, fall is only one of the many irritating Americanisms these authors use. Worst one was Park Avenue instead of Park Lane and "she thinks I have a cute dimple" in a book set in 1815! Val

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Apr 2013 10:33:35 BDT
Last edited by the author on 29 Apr 2013 10:34:45 BDT
Kristin says:
I agree with you, normally a fan.
I would like more proof of 'fall' being English in those times; I hate it as much as 'stoop', 'gotten', 'sidewalk' and all the other stupid Americanisms. Some of the writers have so called degrees in English, too!!??

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Apr 2013 10:44:26 BDT
Couldn't agree more. Other pet hates: cents (instead of pennies) marketing (instead of shopping and done instead of finish. I once read a book where the 18th century hero said "she thinks my dimples are cute" - I threw the book against the wall and shredded it rather than take to charity shop! Thew fact is these books are written for Americans and it is clear that editors care less for accuracy than sales. My point is that surely readers would accept autumn, shopping etc. But I fear we Brits are in the minority. Joanna Bourne though is better than most.

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Apr 2013 11:44:17 BDT
'Fall' dates from the 1600s. You can find it in the online etymological dictionary (I'd link, but I'm on a new device and haven't figured out copy and paste yet). I'm with you on sidewalk, stoop, and gotten.

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Apr 2013 12:11:04 BDT
Kristin says:
Exactly! We are told, often, that Americans love our accents and all things English and writers should be proud to show us the courtesy of writing in the style of the times they are portraying in their books; as my views become more jaded, I feel that they are earning so much money churning out series upon series of books that they could not care less as long as the Pre-Order button is clicked.
When a book really gets my goat and I have complained bitterly out loud, I pop it into the recycle bin without the aggravation of shredding. Have you tried Dorothy Dunnett? The best ever!!
Best wishes,
Kristin

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Apr 2013 12:18:47 BDT
Kristin says:
Oh, thank you for that information, Mrs Staniford, I will check it out; I still find it grates, even if it is acceptable. Copy and Paste eludes me too, so I gave up!
Kristin
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