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68 of 71 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars RICHARD III AND BOSWORTH - A NEW INTERPRETATION, 16 Jan. 2003
This review is from: Bosworth 1485: The Psychology of a Battle (Battles & Campaigns) (Hardcover)
This is more than a book about a battle. Bosworth 1485 - The Psychology of a Battle offers a completely new perspective on that period of English history we know as The Wars of the Roses. It is a challenge to long held assumptions and introduces valuable new contemporary source material. In my view it is the most important book on the subject to appear for many years and will be the yardstick for future debates about this period.
The central figure is Richard III, the most controversial of English Kings. Since his death on the 22nd August 1485 the King's reputation has see-sawed between extremes - Shakespeare's villain on the one side and an unblemished paragon on the other. The truth of course lies somewhere in-between.
Michael Jones' book enables us to place and judge Richard III not only in the context of his own time, but also in the context of his own family - The House of York. He provides arguments and evidence to suggest the possibility that there was something rotten at the heart of this family. It was a rottenness that Richard III, Hamlet-like, tried to remedy. The overthrow of his nephew Edward V, the elder of the two 'Princes in the Tower', an act prompted more by family duty than personal ambition.
Of the battle itself we have not only a new location but also a wholly new way of interpreting the manoeuvres and motivation of the combatants. Contrary to popular belief Richard III had an honourable cause to fight for at Bosworth and this he successfully communicated to his army who remained loyal to the end. Richard's heroic death and defeat was due more to bad luck than betrayal. And therein lies the true tragedy of Richard III.
To anyone with an interest in Richard III and Yorkist England the message from this review is a simple one. Read it.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 7 Jan 2012 11:11:28 GMT
I couldn't agree more. This reviewer (and others) have captured splendidly the virtues of this masterly little book.

Posted on 29 Mar 2012 18:23:53 BDT
Last edited by the author on 29 Mar 2012 18:29:03 BDT
Robert Fripp says:
Reviewer John Saunders writes: "Richard III had an honourable cause to fight for at Bosworth and this he successfully communicated to his army who remained loyal to the end." Indeed Richard did communicate to his army, surely in words less prejudiced than Shakespeare's. This passage from "Dark Sovereign" breathes a fresh approach onto the fatal field:

K.RICHARD: My own true Northern men,
beyond that tongue can tell, ye wot it well,
I love you as myself that stand with me the day. [90]
...I plight ye an assurance,
wherewith the fire may course through every vein
to strength the arm, instil resolve into the blood.
Who marshal here the day hath double right: [100]
We are God's will, His chosenest weapons
wherewith t'indict the pain of treason.
Ye prove allegiance here unto your king,
by that unto your hearths, and that ye love.
[D.S. Act 5, scene 9, the final scene.]

Robert Fripp,
Author, "Dark Sovereign"
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Location: Plymouth, Devon United Kingdom

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