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5.0 out of 5 stars FROM THE BOOKS INTRODUCTION, 20 Feb. 2010
This review is from: The family Greig in Russia
Hardback, Green Cloth, Gilt Titles To Spine, 8" 5", (vii) 244pp.. Edited and bound by Joanne Garland, Greenfield, Massachusetts. Comprising of a Limited Edition of 70 copies.

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INTRODUCTION.

Sarah [1] Cook, born around 1752 to a Scottish merchant and his wife, married a Russian naval officer, Grand Admiral Samuel K. Greig (see facing page - Frontispiece). Their union would give rise to children and grandchildren who later married into the Russian nobility. This extensive Greig family line is described in detail in the present voume.
This work is a new examination of the descendants of Sarah [1] (Cook) Greig (c. 1752-1793) in Russia. The history of this family may be reconstructed to a degree from records such as the family burial ground in the Smolensky Cemetery, records in the Russian Archives, and historical references made in the mass of publications available on Russian history.
As for the eventual fate of this family line, inquiry made to Dr. Dimitry Fedosov of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow resulted in the opinion that Sarah [1] (Cook) Greig's Russian descendants were later "exterminated" during the Russian Revolution.
We know know that the last male survivor who carried the name Greig was probably Baron Ivan von Greig of Konigsburg, who died in 1956. However, a possibility remains that female branches of the Greig family may have produced descendants who are still living. One of these branches is that of Vera Greig, who married Count Peter Ivanovich Tolstoy, brother of the director of the Hermitage.
The present inquiry into the Greig descendants in Russia has produced the surprising finding that Greig (1853-1870), daughter of the Russian Admiral Alexis Samuilovich Greig (1775-1845), married Prince Esper A. Ukhtomsky [11] (1832-1885), [12] giving rise to a noble line of descent that has a living representative. This living descendant was born Princess Natalya Ukhtomskaya in 1945, daughter of Prince Dimittry Ukhtomskii (1912-1993), a well-known Russian photographer.
One should also note that throughout the following text, frequent reference is made to9 the Russian city known as St. Petersburg. However, from 1700 and earlier through the present time, this city has been known variously as "Pertrograd," "St. Petersburg," and "Leningrad." This text does not trouble itself with the relationship between name and chronology, but rather refers to this geographical location as "St. Petersburg."

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[11] The spelling that appears in MERSH (Modern Encyclopedia of Russian and Soviet History, 51 volumes, Gulf Breeze, Florida) is "Ukhtomskii." It is often rendered as "Ukhtomsky," and in French it becomes "Oukhtomsky."

[12] Note on dates: Western writers concerned with Russian matters generally note in thier preface that Russian dates are given in accord with the Julian calendar [O.S. = old style], which ran behind the the Gregorian calandar [N.S. = new style] by twelve days in the 19th centuary and 13 days in the 20th century until Lenin's revolution on 25 October 1917, which is now 7 November 1917. The general reader is usually interested in the 'sequence' of events rather than the 'absolute' timing demanded by "scholars." The latter is of interest in comparing European events with Russian events, which is a tedious and generally unrewarding process. Here we offer dates that reflect the documents from which they were obtained, sometimes carvings in stone.

Also woth noting is the fact that by Slavic custom, rank was inherited by 'all' of a noble's legitimate children, rather than by only the first-born male ("primogeniture").
Thus, Russian nobilty included a vast proliferation of individuals. The noble ranks were ordered as follows for males:
Tsar
Grand Duke
Prince {German: Furst} [Russian: Knaez]
Count [German: Graf]
Baron

On 24 January 1722 a "Table of 14 Ranks" was promulagated so that all Russians would know their 'place' in society.

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I WOULD LIKE TO GIVE THE READER MORE INFORMATION ON THIS VERY INTERESTING FAMILY TREE, BUT IT WOULD TAKE FOR EVER. HOPE THAT THE ABOVE IVES YOU A GOOD IDEA OF THE BOOKS CONTENTS (many black white photographs). Has stated, the book was printed has a limited edition of 70 books - Copyright, (AUTHOR COMPILER) by A. l. FULLERTON, (2001).
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Initial post: 24 Aug 2012 10:59:54 BDT
rosefc says:
I should be most interested to know more as my maiden name was Greig and I have family papers regarding the family of Samuel Greig.
email address is caprington@googlemail.com
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