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37 of 40 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good, but dated, 19 April 2006
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This review is from: The Design of Everyday Things (Paperback)
It's an exceptional book, so why have I given it only 4 stars?

Certainly not the books fault, but this book does tend to get recommended to students as the definitive book for software interface design.

The book is quite dated, being just a renamed reprint of 1989 book "The Psychology of Everyday Things", identical content, except with a new foreword.

The insight into the flawed design of everyday objects is amazing, but could have been so much better if instead of just updating the foreword new chapters were added dealing with modern issues (computers, satellite tv, mobile phones, etc).

Reading this book will still make high tech designers better, but don't expect it to be as relevant to you as it was to your lecturer who read it 17 years ago.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 22 Apr 2010 11:04:28 BDT
N. Hornby says:
I don't think it matters if the examples are iPhones or Betamax players; the principles remain the same.

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Oct 2011 16:19:47 BDT
DdV says:
I would tend to agree with N Hornby above.
The principals behind The Psychology of Everyday Things are still of relevance today - I oft site the example of the one-button slide projector to UI designers.
Common affordances, which is in essence what the book is about, have changed very little in the last twenty or so years. Sure, the base level of technology knowledge has increased but this doesn't change the fact that function and affordance should be clear and intuitive.
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