Customer Review

3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant,fascinating, 22 May 2014
This review is from: Anonymous (Amazon Instant Video)
Endlessly interesting. Yes, it does take careful watching; the structure can at times be a bit confusing. I've watched it three times in succession, partly because I found it so compelling and also because it took another viewing to understand precisely the course of events and relationships. Rhys Ifans is brilliant and heartbreakiing as the anonymous creator of the most beautiful writing in the history of the English language. I'd have given it five stars were it not for the computer generated imagery, which for me gave it the feel at times of a sophisticated computer game, and also because the script contains some unfortunate turns of phrase. We have, for instance, Robert Cecil saying 'Your majesty, we have not as of yet.....' 'As of yet' sounds ugly and is grammatically incorrect. Some of the utterances of the Shakespeare character were similarly jarring. But, that aside, I had heard only briefly of the Oxfordian theory of the authorship before I watched this film, and had dismissed it, I was therefore surprised that to find it highly plausible. Interestingly, Freud apparently believed that de Vere was the author, saying that all authors betray something of themselves in their creative work and that this therefore convinced him the writer has to be de Vere. Ultimately I find it is simply very moving to believe, as I now do thanks to this film, that the beauty of the language and such profound understanding of our human nature emanated from a writer who has remained anonymous.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments

Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 7 Jul 2014 12:24:03 BDT
Thank you for a perceptive review. And thank you also for mentioning Freud's interest in the Shakespeare authorship question. Yes, he was skeptical about the traditional theory. Around 1926, he read the 1920 book that first proposed Edward de Vere as the real author. Then he re-read it. Then he tried to persuade his fellow psychoanalysts to re-examine Shakespeare's plays, connecting them with the life and mind of their true author. The power of the Stratford lobby thwarted him. To my knowledge, I am the second psychoanalyst (after Bronson Feldman, Ph.D.) to take up Freud's request, in some 60 publications on this topic.

In reply to an earlier post on 7 Jul 2014 19:51:48 BDT
CallyK says:
Thanks Richard, I didn't know any of this, am grateful to you for your comments.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›

Review Details

Item

3.6 out of 5 stars (109 customer reviews)
5 star:
 (37)
4 star:
 (32)
3 star:
 (11)
2 star:
 (16)
1 star:
 (13)
 
 
 
Add to wishlist
Reviewer


Location: England

Top Reviewer Ranking: 614,824