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6 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 80's revival - what 80's revival?, 30 July 2004
This review is from: Mod: Clean Living Under Very Difficult Circumstances - A Very British Phenomenon (Paperback)
Fantastic book, but I think the point was lost on the so-called revivalists and particularly by the Aus.(Sydney) reviewer.
The revivalist Mods simply took the iconic clothes,transportation and guitar chords to create a pastiche of the original movement at a time when there was not much 'else' happening as an alternative.
Not many handmade suits, male make-up, driving shoes or nylon 'pakamacs' made their appearance in '79-'80. That 'revival' was little like opting for Harry Connick (or worse still Brit-popper Robbie Williams) over Frank Sinatra's original work.
Modernism was dead, or in it's death throws by 1965, and only the UK. kids, now aged 55-60, really knew what it was all about, the rest are just guessing, or living on hi-jacked imagery and Quadrophenia videos.
The London 'Acid-jazz' movement WAS the closest 'scene' to Modernism, in as much as, there was a tactile originality to the fashion and the music. But, like it's predecessor, it too, lived young... and died fast!!
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 12 Sep 2010 20:33:43 BDT
Last edited by the author on 12 Sep 2010 20:34:58 BDT
Interesting. I'd always felt that Mods were proto soulboys and that the thread they started lived on through skins, suedes (even bootboys) and then into the southern jazz funkers (Northern Soulboys were still wearing terrace garb, baggies and vests!) eventually into house and Acid House when the trail ran cold in a wet field somewhere in the home counties and they went back to something more akin to the hippy ethos.After that everyone wore-and wears-sportswear. Perhaps Acid Jazz was a thread but dress wise to looked back to Mod styling, JTQ etc,and even the music though good wasn't devastatingly original. The last truly British export (musically, not satorially) must be drum and bass.
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