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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars bomb girls., 31 Oct 2013
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This review is from: Bomb Girls - Britain's Secret Army: The Munitions Women of World War II (Kindle Edition)
The subject matter is interesting, but the girl's stories are quite repetitive. However, it does provide a good insight into the way the British public 'pitched in' during WW2 in a selfless way. Unfortunately I doubt that many of the youth of today will pick the book up, which is a great pity, for they could learn that celebrity culture is paltry rubbish compared with self sacrifice.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 6 Mar 2014 18:39:25 GMT
Last edited by the author on 6 Mar 2014 19:18:47 GMT
Mikey C says:
I am interested in this book because my mother worked in an armaments factory during WW2. However I don't feel it's right that the experiences of her generation should be used as a stick to beat 'the youth of today'.

When Mum talked about the war it was usually about the good times (NAAFI dances, etc), but there were glimpses of the horror; her family home in Portsmouth 'bombed out' with the loss of pets and possessions, friends lost aboard HMS Hood, having to stay in 'digs' where she was afraid to use the bath because a previous girl lodger had committed suicide in it (what was that about, I wonder?) and being machine-gunned in the street by a German fighter plane and having to take shelter in a shop doorway. The long-term effects of undiagnosed Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in my family and others' are hard to quantify but very real. This is 'self sacrifice' that we could all do without.

So far as 'celebrity culture' is concerned, 'going to the pictures' was a mainstay in those and even Ann Frank had her wall pasted with pictures from movie magazines. The entertainment industry did its bit and stars vied with each other to visit the troops and appear in morale-boosting films such 'Hollywood canteen'. (Admittedly the 'celebrities' of today are talent-free and unattractive by comparison, but that is a completely different discussion...)

60 million people - over 2.5% of the world's population - were slaughtered during WW2, which was an unimaginable human tragedy. With modern weaponry, the human race would not survive another conflict on that scale. It really shouldn't be glamorized.
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