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Customer Review

12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, 4 May 2012
This review is from: The Moral Landscape (Paperback)
All moral decisions relate at some level to the well being of conscious creatures. One can determine what types of things promote well being, and which don't. Science is how we do this. Science can answer moral questions.

The above is of course far too simple, but promotes I think the general feeling of this latest work by Harris. I love his clear logical manner in most of his work and this is similar. Humorous tone to much of the analogies and very easy to read and understand.

Essentially, I agree with pretty much all of what was said within. Much objection to what I see as pretty unobjectionable ideas seems to be from those who are reluctant to accept that what exists in terms of emotion and thought is "simply" reduced at some point to scientific reasons.

Not liking something is no reason to deny it.

Well worth reading.
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Showing 1-3 of 3 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 7 May 2012 21:31:40 BDT
M. D. Kearns says:
......"Not liking something is no reason to deny it".......

Well said.

Posted on 14 Jul 2012 21:09:02 BDT
Last edited by the author on 14 Jul 2012 21:09:20 BDT
Neutral says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on 13 Aug 2012 22:46:54 BDT
Surely the point being made here is that in the future science will (or may!) be able to assist us with creating our moral code, not that it has already done so. Bringing historical events into the picture is a bit like criticising modern medicine for not being around during the black death.
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Location: Scotland, UK.

Top Reviewer Ranking: 369