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10 of 65 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Stripping of the Altars 2nd edition, 25 Aug. 2010
This review is from: The Stripping of the Altars: Traditional Religion in England,1400-1580 (Paperback)
David Huntley, Toronto
I will charitably refrain from commenting on Professor Duffy's faulty logic and gratuitous assumptions and omissions. Instead I will make a remark on one aspect of history in a period outside of that with which Professor Duffy is concerned. Both Protestant and Catholic countries have committed imperialistic atrocities, including England's wanton destruction of Irish language and culture. Yet domestic democratic politics evolved in Protestant much earlier than in Catholic countries. While there were many other factors the latitudinarianism of most Protestant denominations must have played a role here. if this is true, then as a non-believer I pray that the citizens of democratic countries thank God for the Reformation and that he grant Professor Duffy absolution.
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Showing 1-8 of 8 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 9 Sep 2010 20:43:46 BDT
R. King says:
It would be nice if you actually... you know... reviewed the book. You make unspecific criticisms, please expand.

Posted on 1 Oct 2010 10:19:28 BDT
[Deleted by Amazon on 30 Dec 2011 23:48:38 GMT]

Posted on 12 Apr 2012 11:26:54 BDT
Last edited by the author on 12 Apr 2012 11:27:24 BDT
And good luck with your religion of DEMOCRACY and its revolutions and wars to impose it: French revolution Bolshevik Revolution Chinese Revolution Pol Pot Revolution up to Afganisthan Iraqui wars .... A very very best new world...

Posted on 19 Dec 2012 16:33:24 GMT
Cathbad says:
This is simply not correct! England was an absolute monarchy after the Reformation, abolishing the distinction between church and state (against traditional teaching). The alleged "democrat" Oliver Cromwell closed down parliament every time they didn't do as they were told, dissolving parliament three times (and of course removed any rights for Catholics, as well as killing 40% of the Irish population). Cromwell was a Tyrant, and the Victorians put a statue of him outside parliament, at the same time they were denying democracy to the Irish. Even when women in (protestant) England were given the vote (in 1918, after WWI) only property-owning women over 30 were allowed to vote, 21 was the age for men. When (Catholic) Ireland gained independence in 1922 women were had the vote on equal terms with men, and Ireland had female members of parliament & ministers right from the start in 1922. The point made by this book is that the Reformation was deeply unpopular in England, it was imposed by force against the wishes of the people by a brutal military monarchist regime. I don't know where people get the idea that protestantism is favorable to democracy and human rights; consider (protestant) USA, where racial segregation was perpetuated into the 1960s. Protestantism was (and to a large degree still is) a religious movement that exists to protect the ruling class and to keep the poor obedient, wail about their sins, and whatever you do don't complain about your poverty; (think of the role of Protestantism in the Scottish Highland Clearances of the 18th & 19th centuries, both in organizing the atrocity and in silencing any will to descent or protest). Democracy was won (not by protestantism, or any version of middle eastern religion) by humanists, free-thinkers, and socialists FIGHTING the forces of protestantism (& Catholicism). The protestant state-churches were dragged kicking and screaming to the reforms of the modern age, democracy, equality, freedom, and human & civil rights.

Posted on 20 Jul 2013 16:24:24 BDT
Last edited by the author on 20 Jul 2013 16:25:01 BDT
All members of the Church of England and of the Church of Rome subscribe to the Apostolic Creed and to the Nicene Creed. Ergo, both the Church of England and the Church of Rome are part of the Catholic Church. 'Protestants' on the one hand, and 'Catholics' on the other may be terms in popular use. That doesn't make such terms accurate, correct or even useful.

Define what you mean by 'domestic democratic politics'. There has never been and there never will be a culture in which every living person, young or old, whatever their status has an equal say or interest in political outcomes. In many so-called democracies, no one can vote until they are at least eighteen, even though they may marry at sixteen. Further, they have to be a resident citizen - non-citizen residents have no say in local or national elections, irrespective of whether they work and pay taxes or not. Non-resident UK citizens, who continue to own property in the UK, and thus pay UK taxes on the income and capital gains from that property, plus local rates if it is unoccupied, but did not maintain their name in the UK electoral register, lost the right to vote in UK elections six years after they left the UK. If they have a dispute with a UK government department, they can only take their dispute to the UK Parliamentary Ombudsman if, when they make their complaint, they are resident in the UK (with a couple of exceptions). And so on.

Murdoch who is now a naturalised Yank, not even a UK citizen, wields enormous power in UK politics. This has far-reaching effects on UK national elections because of Murdoch's control of so much of the UK media, far beyond those to which he should be entitled on the basis of one man - one vote.

Posted on 17 Aug 2013 20:28:10 BDT
Last edited by the author on 17 Aug 2013 20:28:31 BDT
You wrote,

"if this is true, then as a non-believer I pray that the citizens of democratic countries thank God for the Reformation and that he grant Professor Duffy absolution. "

To whom do you pray as an unbeliever?

Posted on 18 Mar 2014 15:22:28 GMT
Shutt says:
Are you referring to Duffy's faulty logic on p. 279 or perhaps his gratuitous assumptions on pp. 52-54 or omissions on p. 106, p. 496 or elsewhere? You're not are you, because you've not so much as sneezed at the book let alone read it. What on earth are you talking about in place of a review of this book?

Posted on 13 Nov 2014 09:38:45 GMT
R. E. Cox says:
You say you are a non-believer but you are praying that that 'the citizens of democratic countries thank God......'. I'm puzzled!
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