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Customer Review

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good book but perhaps mis-titled, 22 Oct. 2012
This review is from: Catherine Howard: The Adulterous Wife of Henry VIII (Hardcover)
After having read & enjoyed two of Loades previous works, 'The Boleyns' & 'Mary Rose' I was anxious to give this book a try. Loades writes in a clear style, the facts are presented in a concise fashion, and the clear print of the Amberley hard backs makes the reading experience a real joy. The only trouble is, Catherine is barely mentioned in the first hundred pages of the book (there are 188 in total). Loades spends a great deal of time setting the scene and describing the historical context-too much time perhaps because Catherine's story only really begins halfway through. When she is brought into the narrative, her story is told with great gusto but by the end of it one is left feeling a little bemused by the title of the book ie 'Catherine Howard'. Perhaps a more apropos title would be Heny & Catherine a joint biography?
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 23 Oct 2012 18:53:14 BDT
I think that is Amberley's influence regards the title as their Tudor biographies tend to have subtitles. I haven't read the book as yet but I believe Loades looks at the wider picture of Tudor politics with regard to Henry's match with Catherine Howard so to subtitle it as such is a shame and may mislead. The subtitle will help it sell which, in my opinion, is Amberley's primary objective.

I too am a Loades fan as you will see from some of my reviews of his books. I think you'll also enjoy Richard Rex even more. His books on Elizabeth and The Tudors are superb!

In reply to an earlier post on 31 Oct 2012 01:02:47 GMT
This reviewer may wish to try the chapter on Catherine Howard in Retha Warnicke's Wicked Women of Tudor England: Queens, Aristocrats, Commoners (Queenship and Power), which has been mentioned in the other reviews of this book. I just read Warnicke's study of Catherine Howard a few days ago, and it's as good as Lacey Baldwin Smith's, if not better.
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