Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn more Shop now Shop now
Customer Review

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Accomplished debut from Coventry's finest, 22 Nov. 2007
This review is from: We'll Live And Die In These Towns (Audio CD)
After a gruelling schedule of UK tours, two smash-hit singles and a whole world of hype, "We'll Live And Die In These Towns" the now long and eagerly awaited debut album by Coventry 3-piece The Enemy surpasses all expectations.

Although Coventry's unlikely looking new rock sensations are unusually reluctant to offer up the names of their musical influences, "We Live And Die" is an album that reveals it's many roots as readily and as reassuringly as the most painstakingly completed family tree. At times Clarke's voice is almost scarily reminiscent of a young Paul Weller, and several tracks, most notably the title track, take on a fittingly Jam-like feel. There's an immediate, all-consuming energy to We Live And Die that echoes Oasis' classic debut. Add to that a swaggering, over confident attitude conjured up by Tom Clarke's invigorating vocals, and no doubt inspired by a similar working background to the Gallaghers, and a more than passing resemblance to the Manc legends early sound and attitude is complete. Throw the Sex Pistols, The Verve, and The Who into the mix and you're still only scratching the surface. Although comparisons to such lofty names are all well and good, to imply The Enemy are somehow lacking their own sound would be doing them a disservice. These young lads have welded together the sounds of their influences with a skill and unwavering confidence that belies their inexperience. More punk than Oasis will ever be, more Brit-rock than The Sex Pistols ever could have been, this is high octane inide rock n roll that sounds less like the Stereophonics and more like the Pigeon Detectives getting a kicking for pissing off the Clash's roadies.

The tone of the album is set from the very first bars of opening track, Aggro, and carries on from there at a blistering pace. Pounding drum rolls demand your attention, screaming guitars grab you the by the lapels, before Clarke's intoxicating vocals shake you back and forth "Call the pol-eeeeece, `cos things are getting ugly!" You're left in no doubt that The Enemy are not messing about. Only one track (the gloriously uplifting This Song) breaks the four minute barrier, and the title track aside there are no extended intros, no long drawn out outros, what you get are short sharp bursts of attitude, at times raucous, at times reflective, always lyrically depicting a recognisably gritty image of life in provincial England whilst musically screaming an infectious devil-may-care optimism. We'll Live And Die offers something that so many albums aspire to without ever delivering, it's got something to say, and it says it with attitude.

On this offering, The Enemy promise to be far more than just another bunch of Northern(ish) teen rockers making it big on the post Arctic Monkeys bandwagon. A chest-beating, foot stomping, call-to-arms of a record, this is quite possibly the most accomplished debut of it's kind since Definitely Maybe was unleashed on an unsuspecting public all those years ago, an evocative rallying cry certain to strike a chord with working class lads in dead end jobs the length and breadth of the country.

And the timing couldn't be better. With Oasis on gardening leave playing with the super band formula, this nation's heartbeat is crying out for a new soundtrack. This might just be it.

Winston Roache
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

Be the first person to comment on this review.

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
  [Cancel]