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Customer Review

14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Laugh? I almost died., 27 Nov. 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Marx Brothers: A Night At The Opera [VHS] (VHS Tape)
If you have never seen a Marx brothers film before, this is the perfect place to start. It has all the characteristics of any of their movies. Groucho's witty one-liners, Harpo's energetic miming and Chico's.... well he's just funny. The rewind button on my remote control had been worn out by the time the film had finished. The opening night at the opera slayed me, with Harpo swinging on the ropes backstage. The plot is that Groucho persuades Mrs Claypoole ( a rich widow, played by Margerate Dumont - as usual ) to donate money to the opera house. He and his bros, after being smuggled into the country, set about sabotaging the opera in order to give an aspiring singer his big break. Alright, it's not that complex, but you don't have to be a genius to understand any Marx Brothers plot. That is the beauty of it. The musical numbers do drag on a bit, but this IS an opera! This film is the Marx Brothers at their best. Do you follow me? Yes? Well stop following me or i'll have you arrested! ( Groucho at his most romantic. ) A MUST FOR ANY MARX BROTHERS FAN - AND EVERYONE ELSE BESIDES.
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Initial post: 7 Oct 2010 11:53:21 BDT
Last edited by the author on 7 Oct 2010 12:12:49 BDT
Hmm. This review has its good points with which I fully agree, having first been 'slayed' by the slapstick humour at school in the 1950s. Yet to state that 'the musical numbers do drag...' surely misses the point. The fine range of music and musical performances form a crucial part of what is one of the most enduring, best film comedies of all time: while they complement the action and fun they give us so much pleasure. (I read that Winston Churchill once said his Marx Bros films he loved to watch in his War Cabinet bunker were his favourite means of relaxation during the grim years of World War II.)
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