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Customer Review

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Alexander on Ace, 28 Nov. 2011
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This review is from: The Greatest (Audio CD)
The early 1960s saw pop music at a low ebb until The Beatles, Dylan et al took over, so Arthur Alexander was up against it. This collection of songs display a great singer not always well served by prevailing fashion, yet his performances on every track consist of his own heartfelt, yet unfussy style. His soft, rich voice at first suggests safety and dependability, but its delicate quiver turns each song into something vulnerable and moving without being histrionic. There are syrupy moments among these recordings, but they are the work of arrangers rather than the singer whose stamp shines through on each song.

'Anna' is the outstanding track and it's no surprise that The Beatles pilfered it, while the poignant 'You Better Move On' was an odd choice by the Stones. Alexander wrote both, but very few of the remaining songs. The much-recorded 'A Shot Of Rhythm And Blues' shows that he could carry off more uptempo, upbeat material, while 'Detroit City', better known as one of Tom Jones's country outings, is a reminder that Alexander crossed genres without difficulty. The comprehensive sleevenotes tell of yet another artist rip-off and of Alexander's premature death, fuelled by a problematic lifestyle. This CD suggests a man influential rather than successful, but it's classy and beautifully presented.
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Initial post: 11 Sep 2014 11:42:13 BDT
Last edited by the author on 11 Sep 2014 11:54:14 BDT
The Greatest Must take issue with your myopic view of early 60s music "The Beatles, Dylan et al took over," good for them . but thats not the whole story there was another WORLD of black American music which was going through major changes at that time into Soul music which Arthur Alexander was a part of. there were different things taking place at that time which must be judge in there own right. It should be pointed out that both The Beatles, and Dylan, never sold many if any records to black America who had there own thing going on. You should not just lump it all together there is more than one history they are many.
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D. J. H. Thorn
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   

Location: Hull, UK

Top Reviewer Ranking: 2,278