ARRAY(0xa6a2993c)
 
Customer Review

4 of 18 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars This lion would have died of starvation!, 5 Oct 2009
This review is from: The Lion Who Wanted To Love (Orchard Picturebooks) (Paperback)
The little lion was a wonderfully kind and loving lion, but to expect children to believe that a lion cub could leave it's mother and live without food is nonsensical. We might be sorry for animals who are killed and eaten by lions etc, but how on earth would lions survive if they didn't do so? There must be other more realistic ways of teaching children compassion without giving them a false idea of nature and wildlife.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments

Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-3 of 3 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 17 Dec 2010 10:50:08 GMT
Chris Jones says:
I've not read this book, though have read several others by the same author to my grandson, and he loves them. J Atkinson has posted an interesting comment on a piece of fiction, but I wonder if he/she is forgetting that this is a story, and one for very young children. The story of Father Christmas is completely ludicrous - but it's a lasting myth which brings delight to millions of children across the world. But perhaps Santa Claus doesn't visit the Atkinson household because having a person on a sleigh pulled by magic flying reindeer delivering presents to every child and entering households through the chimney (irrespective of whether the property has a chimney or not) defies the laws of physics and logic. Sad, if that's the case.

Posted on 4 Dec 2011 19:13:59 GMT
Sally_ says:
I'm not a fan of this book but, in its defence, I should let you know that there's a line in it stating that the lion's food was given to him by the other animals!

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Dec 2011 20:07:01 GMT
Chris Jones says:
I've now read this book and, though not one of my very favourite stories to read the grandson, it's fine. More to the point, the grandson likes it. The reasons for reading to children are many. One is spend time with a child on a one-to-one basis, interacting with him or her. Another is to entertain the child. A third is to have the opportunity to fill a child with wonder and a bit of magic. Another is to have the chance to explain things - whether it's what noises an animal makes, what they eat, or what colour they are. Children usually don't see the inconsistencies until an adult points them out. If and when they do realise that, er, lions aren't vegetarians in reality, then you've got an opportunity to talk to them meaningfully about it. As it happens, lions don't, as a rule, converse with other animals in English either. Surely that's an even more basic issue for nit-pickers to get their teeth into.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›

Review Details

Item

4.7 out of 5 stars (35 customer reviews)
5 star:
 (29)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
5.99 3.85
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Reviewer


Location: Yorkshire

Top Reviewer Ranking: 198,782