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Customer Review

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars could be better, 2 April 2009
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This review is from: How to Win Every Argument: The Use and Abuse of Logic (Paperback)
I got interested in fallacies and making valid arguments. I found lots of good material on the net, but wanted something a bit more portable and with more structure to it. This book sounds ideal, but it's more of a dictionary of all the types of fallacy such as ad hominem, red herring, straw man, and lots of others that I never knew existed - about ninety are defined. A few pages are devoted to each entry, explaining what they are, giving examples and how to try and use them successfully. I don't like that aspect - promoting the use of fallacies and how to get away with it. Looks like I did buy the wrong book; I would not have bought it if I'd known it was a dictionary. As a learning guide, there must be better books than this which break fallacies into groupings, such as logical, emotional and ethical. For me, this book will be reference only; I'll look for something better and refer to this one if I need further examples. Like me, you will find better for free on the net.
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Showing 1-4 of 4 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 26 Nov 2010 10:07:01 GMT
J. MacManus says:
Pat - I use this book as useful reference when struggling to remember why an argument is flawed, and how, and what it's called etc. but it's alphabetical structure is limiting - did you find a better one?

Posted on 27 Dec 2010 16:30:59 GMT
My thoughts exactly. The dictionary-style structure of this book is hardly ideal; a grouping system would be much more useful. I would be interested to find a book that has a more logical structure.

In reply to an earlier post on 31 May 2011 15:40:23 BDT
Pat says:
I found 'Asking the right questions' by Browne and Kelley - read the reviews and see if it's what you're after. The book discusses logical fallacies, but not in depth. The reviews convinced me and I was not disappointed with the book. It has given me new insights on setting up sound arguments and of course, allows one to pick valid holes in others' arguments. Wish I'd found it, and, wish I'd been interested in this twenty years ago!

Posted on 22 Sep 2015 13:14:33 BDT
Last edited by the author on 22 Sep 2015 13:15:18 BDT
Mr. T. White says:
Hello folks, I owned Madsen Pirie's seminal text "The Book Of The Fallacy", which I found to be excellent. Nonetheless, there are two alternative options for those who are seeking another primer on the logical fallacies. After all, anyone who writes (or thinks), needs to have a firm grasp of all the logical fallacies. Yes, ALL!

Option 1): Especially if you're skint, you can simply look up Wikipedia's entry aka 'list of fallacies' and you'll see them all listed. Wikipedia has their being grouped into formal and informal fallacies, Red herrings etc., so it's pretty useful.

Option 2): If you don't mind rewarding another author (a good idea!), you might look to buy the very well reviewed Bo Bennett's 'Logically Fallacious'.

HTH :-)
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