Customer Review

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slow-moving existential angst..., 21 Sep 2013
This review is from: A Tale for the Time Being (Hardcover)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Shortlisted for the 2013 Booker, this tells two intertwined tales - of Nao, a Japanese schoolgirl, and of Ruth, a Canadian author of Japanese heritage. Ruth has found Nao's journal washed up on the shore and begins to obsess about finding out whether the people and events Nao discusses are true. Nao's story is of a young girl who has lived most of her life in California but has now returned to Japan and we see the society through her eyes.

Nao's story is interesting, if bleak. Having been brought up in California, Nao is seen as an outsider by her classmates on her return to Japan. We learn of the extreme bullying she is both subjected to and participates in at school, leading her to drop out. Meantime, her suicidal father is making repeated failed attempts to end his own life, leading Nao to harbour suicidal thoughts of her own. In an effort to break this cycle, her parents send her to spend the summer with her old great-grandmother, a Zen nun, who rapidly becomes Nao's sole support and spiritual guide. While here, Nao learns the story of her great-uncle, a war-hero who died during WWII.

Ruth's story is a dull distraction. Ruth is a writer, struggling with long-term writers block, giving Ozeki the opportunity to tell the reader, at length, how very, very tough life is for writers - even one who lives in fairly idyllic surroundings with no apparent real health or money worries and with a partner who loves and supports her. She is also in a perpetual state of existential angst and this part of the novel merely serves to interrupt and slow to a crawl the telling of Nao's tale. And to make matters worse, Ozeki introduces a quasi-mystical, quasi-quantum-mechanical element into Ruth's part that turns Nao's believable and often moving story into some kind of mystical fantasy in the end. The underlying questions that are being examined - of identity and the nature of time - are addressed with a subtlety in Nao's story that is almost destroyed by the clumsy handling of Ruth's portion of the book.

The writing is skilful and confident for the most part and, when telling a plain tale, Ozeki writes movingly and often beautifully. Unfortunately she has attempted to be too clever in this, not just with the supernatural nonsense, but with the whole conceit of Ruth translating Nao's diary as we go along. This leads to lots of unnecessary footnotes, silly little drawings and playing with fonts, all of which merely serve to distract from the story. Ruth will translate a sentence except for one or two words, which she leaves as Japanese in the main body of the text, and then gives the translation a footnote - why? It would be understandable if she only did this with concepts which may be unfamiliar to a Western audience, but she does it for normal words - like leaving in 'zangyo' and telling us in a footnote that this means 'overtime'. The flow of reading is constantly interrupted by the need to check the bottom of the page to find out what the sentence means.

While sometimes telling a story from different points of views adds depth, in this case unfortunately the contrast serves only to weaken the thrust and impact of the main story. Had this been a plainer telling of Nao's story alone, it would probably have got top rating from me, and overall there is enough talent on display here to mean that I may look out for more of Ozeki's work, keeping my fingers crossed she finds a way to end future books without resorting to the fantastical. But, for me, it's hard to see how this could stand in contention with either of the other Booker nominees I've read this year - Harvest or The Testament of Mary. Of course, that probably means it will win...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-4 of 4 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 25 Sep 2013 13:44:50 BDT
This is almost exactly the review I'd have written, though I'd have probably been less kind. It was the first of this year's finalists I'd tried as I thought it looked more interesting than the others. I'm delighted to find I was wrong, and will be heading straight for the other finalists instead of assuming they were all dire. Thanks!

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Sep 2013 15:10:11 BDT
FictionFan says:
I loved Testament of Mary and would highly recommend it - I'm hoping it wins. Harvest was very good - beautiful writing - though it fell away a bit towards the end, I thought. But both were head and shoulders above this one, as far as I'm concerned...

Thanks for commenting!

Posted on 25 Sep 2013 17:12:50 BDT
Billybobs says:
Excellent Review and mirrors my sentiments. If this is considered Booker Shortlist material then Mantel need not worry about the 3rd part of Wolf Hall when published. It will be a certain winner.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Sep 2013 00:50:33 BDT
FictionFan says:
Thank you! Yes, it often baffles me how some books make it onto the shortlist - I've read many far better books than this one this year. But given the Booker's track record, it won't surprise me at all if this wins...
‹ Previous 1 Next ›

Review Details

Item

4.4 out of 5 stars (255 customer reviews)
5 star:
 (151)
4 star:
 (65)
3 star:
 (28)
2 star:
 (6)
1 star:
 (5)
 
 
 
£20.00 £16.10
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Reviewer

FictionFan
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   

Location: Kirkintilloch, Scotland

Top Reviewer Ranking: 64