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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mindfulness as a 'discovery', 11 Feb 2012
This review is from: Wherever You Go, There You Are: Mindfulness meditation for everyday life (Paperback)
This is a rather twee view of mindfulness with arch references to various mental states and not a book for experienced meditators. However, for newcomers to the field described as a 'state of mindfulness', it is an excellent introduction because it is free from the mumbo jumbo of spiritual religiosity and in plain language describes some of the entry points. It does overdo the ritualisation of mindfulness, which suggests the authors are themselves in new territory and do not have the depth of experience implied by their work. For anyone wishing to discover the realm of mindfulness, start here but be prepared for more.
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Showing 1-7 of 7 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 31 Mar 2012 18:07:28 BDT
Can you recommend alternatives which do go further into/are written by experienced meditators?

In reply to an earlier post on 2 Apr 2012 08:47:17 BDT
Last edited by the author on 2 Apr 2012 08:52:26 BDT
Dear Mr Dalziel,
You have posed a most difficult question firstly because I do not know where you stand in terms of your knowledge, secondly because the state of mindfulness is a 'conscious' state not the product of meditation and therefore there is a fork in the road, my only advice is 'take it'. If I can have your e-mail address I will attach an excerpt from a book I am writing that puts mindfulness in a wider context. j.burnett@btinternet.com

Posted on 29 Nov 2012 17:07:41 GMT
Boomtrooper says:
"which suggests the authors are themselves in new territory and do not have the depth of experience implied by their work." - given his track record, I think that's a pretty unfair appraisal of Jon Kabat-Zinn!!

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Nov 2012 17:26:39 GMT
Last edited by the author on 29 Nov 2012 17:27:34 GMT
I cannot recall/find the appraisal and am unable to reply to your observation with any precision, but having practiced mindfulness meditation for the past 40 years one can distinguish between a person who speaks from experiential knowledge and theoretical knowledge For example, in mindful meditation the pre-frontal cortex becomes active and over the years increases in size which creates a physical sensation like wearing the front half of a crown. Experienced meditators would comment on this

In reply to an earlier post on 27 Dec 2012 21:59:52 GMT
[Deleted by the author on 30 Dec 2012 22:58:04 GMT]

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Dec 2012 11:21:45 GMT
I wish I were but it seems you have your own views

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Dec 2012 19:31:10 GMT
Last edited by the author on 28 Dec 2012 19:35:40 GMT
It is not easy because you can become entangled with the passivity of Buddhism whereas if you want to 'Get On' you need a synthesis of a number of views. Thich Nhat Hanh in "The Miracles of Mindfulness" identifies the 'inner peace' but that is passive which leaves one with a 'so what' feeling, Charles T.Tart's "Living the Mindful Life" was one of my early introductions and I have warmed to Charley's healthy 'uncertainty'. My trouble is that over the last 70 years I am now hull down on the far reality horizon of most readers. Mindfulness is the most powerful conscious position you can hold it is the conscious bridge between the implicate order, the process dimension of quantum mechanics and the coherence of physical reality - the realm of all those who advocate 'creative visualization', "Write it down and make it happen". Achieving this state is initially done by meditation, but once it becomes experientially familiar you will begin to recognise it as a 'normal daily state' it's the cacophony of the 'chattering monkey' on your shoulder - the Buddhist state of Samsara (illusion) that obscures our awareness of our 'normal' mindful state.
To attempt a helpful answer to your (polite) enquiry the path to mindfulness starts with developing the conscious ability to meditate but not the mantra sort like TM. There is what I call trance meditation, it's like a deep conscious state of prayer, initially you won't get much reaction from a patient practice (say 20 minutes a day) but you will in due course once you have learned to ignore the monkey chatter get the odd experience of someone waiting for you, just a second or two. try to hold the recollection and seek it out on the next occasion (I can assure the connection you are attempting is even more highly prized by this beingness you can sense). Gradually the connection will lead to an intense contentment and that point you are on your way to a mindful life. There is a physical sensation connected with the state of mindfulness which is a little odd and should not be dwelt upon during meditation but it is useful feedback. The effect is as though your are wearing a slightly heavy crown, but only the front half. This is created by the activity of the pre-frontal cortex starting as a sensation point about 1" above each eye but gradually extends to a band across your forehead (the pre-frontal cortex appears to be the 'receiver' for what has been called supramental intelligence by Sri Aurobindo (neurologists' say that meditation appears to increase the size of the pre-frontal cortex - well that's what Peter Fenwick says and he's a doyen of the field and a thoroughly nice chap).
Hope this is of some help
John Burnett
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