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Customer Review

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well Crafted book on a little known war, 13 Sept. 2012
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This review is from: White Eagle, Red Star: The Polish-Soviet War 1919-20 (Kindle Edition)
This book is about one of those wars that you regularly hear referred to but rarely see any details about.

The war is, of course, most often referred to in the context of the Second World War, mainly because a lot of the major players in that war, De-Gaulle, Stalin, Churchill, Sikorski were also involved. Stalins views on Poland were certainly heavily influenced in this war and you start to understand why the Soviets were so anti Poland and firm on changing the Polish borders at the end of WW2 after reading this.

But this book is also about the chaos and shock that followed WW1. In many ways Europe was more completely shattered by the first than the second world war, and this book captures the atmosphere of that period very well.

Davies prose is at the same time trenchant and informative, which make this book a very entertaining read. You could pick this book and enjoy it even if you have no interest in this particular period of history.
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Initial post: 2 Jan 2014 11:46:26 GMT
"In many ways Europe was more completely shattered by the first than the second world war, and this book captures the atmosphere of that period very well." It's not clear to me what meaning we should attribute to the word a 'shattered' used like this. WW11 caused a level of material destruction that was far, far greater than WW1 - there is no doubt about it. Germany was a ruin, with bombed out cities and barely functioning industry. Poland too hasd seen terrible destruction to its infrastructure. Many British and French cities had been badly bombed.

If you are referring to the social and political chaos after WW1 being greater than after WW11 you could have an argument but only just.
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