Customer Review

54 of 62 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating and essential film..., 24 July 2006
This review is from: Straw Dogs [1971] [DVD] (DVD)
Sam Peckinpah's Cornish western has a heritage of controversy trailing in its wake. Perceived by turns as being misogynistic, exploitative, pornographic and gratuitously violent, it was labelled a "video nasty" in the 1980's and was consequently banned from view in the UK until the tail end of the nineties. An intriguing pedigree.

Essentially, what we have is a movie that uproots some of the values, morality and themes governing the mythic cinematic western and transplants them into an English backwater community. The locals are restless, being envious of and despising the American strangers (Dustin Hoffman and wife Susan George) who intrude on their redneck world. The fact that Hoffman's wife used to be one of their own serves to make matters worse, increasing both tension and conflict.

Hoffman wants to avoid trouble and remain peaceable, but ultimately is pushed too far when his cat is killed, wife is raped and his homestead is laid siege to by his tormentors. He stubbornly offers shelter to Niles, the village idiot, who has just inadvertently killed a young girl. His refusal to surrender the man to the (lynch) mob initiates the violent finale. The stage is set for a man doing what a man's gotta do, and this translates as holding the fort whilst killing and maiming as many of the attacking natives as possible.

The controversy surrounding the film stems primarily from the issues of sex and violence. When Amy (Susan George) is raped by one villager she responds ambiguously by first seeming resistant and naturally unwilling to participate and then appearing to enjoy the experience, encouraging her attacker (who is also an ex-boyfriend). This duality of attitude, this ambivalent mixed message towards forced sex upset many a feminist and non-feminist alike at the time and led to accusations of exploitation and misogyny on the part of the director. Compounding the situation is the fact that immediately following this first act of sexual abuse, Peckinpah then has the Amy character anally raped by another villager. Ultimately, her response is to conceal these events from her husband and appear no more than slightly withdrawn, petulant and a bit miffed. Any psychological and emotional trauma or physical discomfort or damage she may have experienced is ignored and unexplored. In fact, if one is honest, Peckinpah actually succeeds in trivialising rape. Events earlier in the film clearly suggest that she "was asking for it anyway." Amy is seen to "tease" the locals by appearing naked at her window whilst they work on her barn roof outside. This monumentally sexist attitude provoked outrage in the early 1970's and no major filmmaker today would be likely to get away with such an approach to the subject matter. Peckinpah argued that it was in fact cuts by the British censor that actually succeeded in making the rape scenes appear more pornographic and less politically correct than his original intent - but I'm inclined to take this with a pinch of salt.

The violence at the end involves a foot being blown off with a shotgun, a beating with a poker, boiling water being thrown into faces and a semi-decapitation with a man-trap. By today's standards, they can hardly be considered gratuitous or graphic in their depiction. However, it is a testament to Peckinpah's skill as a filmmaker and Dustin Hoffman and Susan George's performances that the experience of the siege is both powerful and harrowing. The drunken mob are suitably menacing, mindless, obnoxious and deserving of their fate. It's an exciting end to what is essentially a slow-burning and action-free movie constructed primarily to gradually crank-up the tension until the climax. In this sense the film does not disappoint. Hoffman gives a nervy, slightly-wired, pacifistic almost to the point of cowardice type of performance throughout that contributes magnificently to the build-up. His character finally snaps under pressure from all the insults, goading and abuse he has received from his antagonists. He utilises the provision of a safe-haven for the mentally challenged Niles more as an excuse to exact revenge, to force a confrontation, than to satisfy any moral rationale he may harbour. The stand-off is not even about retribution for the rape of his wife, more an affirmation of his own manhood, standing up to the bully, facing down the bad guys. Typical macho Peckinpah ideology steeped in Western mythology.

To conclude, Straw Dogs is a fascinating and essential film by a master craftsman. In technical terms, it builds a sense of suspense and ever-increasing dread in the audience with almost clinical expertise. The climax is nearly as cleverly choreographed as the finale to The Wild Bunch - only framed by different culture and in different context. If you can ignore the faintly repugnant ideology behind the rape sequence (which probably says more about Peckinpah's personal attitude towards women than anything else) then this is a true 70's classic that even today has the power to shock and enthral.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments

Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-5 of 5 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 21 Dec 2008 17:40:47 GMT
Last edited by the author on 3 Nov 2011 18:07:39 GMT
John Rose says:
this dvd has been cut like a few other's i could mention.not forgetting that it was cut in the first instance by the british censor ,tell me who these jobsworth's are who decide what we can & can not watch when it goes to home entertainment.anybody feel the same way about these people.i could go stronger but would most probably be censored.!!!
the rape scene was originally filmed in full frame.

In reply to an earlier post on 31 Dec 2008 12:35:56 GMT
Totally agree with you. As consumers we are entitled to see the films we buy in the manner directors tried to make them.

Posted on 31 Dec 2008 12:36:42 GMT
I enjoyed reading your review.

Posted on 14 Oct 2011 22:52:24 BDT
Looks to me as if this reviewer here has grasped just about nothing regarding the real plot of this movie, though it is jam packed with hints in both dialogue and symbolic language. He even claims that Amy isn't deeply disturbed after the rape: "Any psychological and emotional trauma or physical discomfort or damage she may have experienced is ignored and unexplored. In fact, if one is honest, Peckinpah actually succeeds in trivialising rape."

Someone SERIOUSLY needs to watch this film again and then edit his review.

In reply to an earlier post on 11 Dec 2011 19:06:22 GMT
Beanie Luck says:
im sorry but i agree with the op, he does trivialise it. Im a woman too before you get on your high horse, it was filmed as thought she enjoyed it, in fact not only did she enjoy it but she lead him on to the point where he was not able to contain himself, not an excuse but the truth. She openly kisses him, touches him, encourages him to go deeper, and moans slightly too which seems to indicate pleasure.It happens in the new movie too which pis*** me off.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›

Review Details

Item

3.4 out of 5 stars (145 customer reviews)
5 star:
 (42)
4 star:
 (32)
3 star:
 (30)
2 star:
 (21)
1 star:
 (20)
 
 
 
£5.99 £2.96
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Reviewer


Location: UK

Top Reviewer Ranking: 631,686