Customer Review

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting view of a difficult subject, 11 Oct 2010
This review is from: Requiem for a Species (Hardcover)
We still don't really know much about why people react the way they do compared with, say, the science behind the construction of bridges so I was very interested to see how the author would cope with the failure of mankind as a whole to recognise the threats coming down the line from some years in the future while an individual can recognise immediate threats such as a car approaching without difficulty and move out of it's way. I wasn't disappointed.

The book is a thorough (as far as I can tell as a non expert in human behaviour) and thoughtful analysis of the mechanisms that cause some of us to reject actually carrying out the necessary actions while at the same time agreeing that we ought to be doing them. He also tackles the question as to why many people reject the actual evidence. The author doesn't really have a practical solution to the problem but perhaps that's because there isn't one. But if that's the case he's very pessimistic about the future of the human race which I guess is why he's given it the title he has.

The only criticism I have is that he does not seem to place enough emphasis on the problems that are caused by the lack of trust of many ordinary people in authority of one sort or another that has lied to them so often in the past.

A definite read for anyone concerned about our future. If enough people can see the difficulties we face it might help to tip the balance to doing whatever is necessary.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
 

Comments

Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 31 Mar 2011 19:59:47 BDT
Martin Lack says:
Admittedly, I haven't read Clive Hamilton's book yet, but I fully intend to. However, for now, I just wanted to point out that William Ophuls very clearly explains why we don't make the right choices in Chapter 4 of his "Ecology and the Politics of Scarcity Revisited: The Unravelling of the American Dream" (1992). Chapter 8 of which also suggests some solutions... As for that explanation in Chapter 4 well, it has much to do with Hobbes' Leviathan and Hardin's Tragedy of the Commons...
‹ Previous 1 Next ›

Review Details

Item

3.9 out of 5 stars (11 customer reviews)
5 star:
 (6)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
15.00
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Reviewer


Location: UK

Top Reviewer Ranking: 766,948