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258 of 262 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars You may experience a sense of deja vu, 1 Jun 2010
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This review is from: At Home: A short history of private life (Hardcover)
One of the great things about Bill Bryson's books is his ability to grab your attention and draw you in to find out what odd fact he's going to come up with next. So I hadn't even got through the introduction when he came up with the gem about why all churches in Norfolk appear to have sunk into the churchyard (they haven't; it's the churchyard that has risen 3 ft or more because of the number of bodies buried there, which if you do the maths of how many people live in a parish, how many die each year, and how long the churchyards have been there is not so remarkable. And keep on reading to find out just how many bodies were buried in urban cemeteries in the Victorian era - quite astounding). He is also a great debunker of accepted truths - for instance, there's a lot of interesting comment about the widely accepted view that most food, especially bread, was adulterated with all sorts of disgusting and probably toxic substances. Bryson refers to somebody who tried baking bread with all these supposed adulterants, and showed that what was produced was actually inedible, with the exception of alum, which, he points out, if used in small quantities actually improves bread, and is also used nowadays as an additive to many products.

So once again I read this through with great enjoyment and picked up lots of little nuggets of the odd and the interesting. Having said that, however, I did find that I had a sense of deja vu about this book; many of the anecdotes it contains seem to have been recycled from some of his other books (I think that I can recognise quite a lot of them from "Made in America" for example, where they were hung about a framework of American language, rather than around the structure of his wanderings from room to room of his house in Norfolk). And there is rather a lot of anecdotage about very large houses in America which seemed to not have a great deal to do with history as seen through the lens of humble domesticity, which is what I thought the theme of the book was intended to be. Anyway, given the man's prodigious output (this is getting on for the same size a "A Short History of Everything") it wouldn't be surprising if he recycled some material.

But these are minor bits of carping, really, and if you are a more casual reader of Bryson probably won't affect you. It's an entertaining and informative book and well worth the reading.
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Showing 1-4 of 4 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 6 Jun 2010 20:53:40 BDT
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on 7 Jun 2010 08:54:59 BDT
John Brooke says:
What is? The review or the book?

Posted on 22 Jun 2010 16:09:20 BDT
J. G. Phipps says:
I also liked the bits he mentioned - also about how 306000 people fall down stairs every year! Thought that the poor quality pictures and not very nice paper spoilt the book - after the wonderful short history of almost everything the feel and look of the book disappoint

Posted on 26 Jul 2010 02:50:29 BDT
Last edited by the author on 26 Jul 2010 02:55:57 BDT
Tell None says:
I used to live down the road from Mr B.

Norfolk has well over 600 churches in the county (plus countless ruined ones) - it has the biggest density of them anywhere in the World!

Norfolk used to be one of the most densely populated counties of the UK (hence raised burial yards + extension 'fields' next door) and Norwich was a contender with London in importance for a time.
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