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Customer Review

85 of 102 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Timeless music, offered up as a gray area copyright expiration box, 19 Mar. 2012
This review is from: Miles Davis: 20 Classic Albums [10CD] [Audio CD] Miles Davis (Audio CD)
No use dwelling on the musical contents here: 20 albums from Miles Davis's early career. Lots of brilliant material. All > 50 years old, and so eligible for exploitation by anyone who wants to come along and press them. In standard copyright expiration fashion, these all come from existing CD "masters" (there's no access to the actual master tapes), so the best you can hope for is that these aren't worse than the copies you already have. Maybe they are, maybe they aren't.

The packaging is indifferent, as are the liner notes.

No royalties paid to the label or to the estate of Miles Davis. There's really not much difference between this and something you might obtain through questionable means, except that this one you get to pay for.

Every issue like this chips away at the incentive for the labels who actually own the masters to do any further curating or improved mastering. As such, these issues do a disservice to fans.

But they are cheap.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 5 Nov 2012 09:15:02 GMT
Peter Street says:
Er- didn't the US just extend copyright privileges on the grounds that the strange international multiples who have gradually hoovered up the major record companies as adjuncts to their major occupations of waste processing and public service provision at blackmail rates would collapse if they couldn't go on charging top rates for out of date recordings in which they had never shown much technical interest and (some of them) hadn't even "curated" properly? Or reissued - until they fund that other folk were doing a better job on copyright expiry and were making money. These albums are now, in theory, back under copyright protection. But to their owners, they are niche items. Who benefits from that?

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Sep 2013 10:37:48 BDT
I make David Pearlman 100% correct. Copyright provision in the USA has always been longer than in the UK and Europe. And Peter Street's point about not being 'curated' properly simply doesn't apply to Sony's curating of the Miles Davis catalogue - they have done a BRILLIANT job. But of course, they are much more expensive than these cheapo comps from 'Real Gone' - if they are going to rip and burn already available CDs, why not rip and burn the Japanese issues....the answer is, they don't really give a toss about doing a ''better job on copyright expriry'.
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