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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We are what we've eaten, 13 Dec 2007
This review is from: Taste: The Story of Britain Through Its Cooking (Hardcover)
"Taste" by Kate Colquhoun tells the story of Britain through what Britons have cooked and consumed through the ages. It begins with a prehistoric rubbish heap and ends with the flashy cuisine of the 1980's; this is a fast-paced and wide inquiry. Along the way the author unearths plenty of weird facts and anecdotes - washers-up protecting their hands with mutton fat, how Henry VIII accidentally changed our relationship with fish - but the story is what sweeps you along. New foods are imported, like the pineapple, or come back into favour (the tomato - people used to think they were poisonous). Different techniques and gadgets make you wonder how people lived without them in the first place. No refrigerator? Either dig a thirty foot hole and fill it with ice or rub salt into meat to stop it going off. No microwave? It's a charcoal brazier or nothing. This book doesn't just tell you about how people used to live, cook and eat, it makes you re-think how we do these things now. It's a fascinating story, and almost makes you want to cook the stuffed cow's udder on page 203. Almost.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 5 Sep 2010 01:14:40 BDT
Cow's udder is still considered a delicacy in France. It's a bit cheaper than steak, so if you've eaten out there, likely you've been (ahem) Caen'd.
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